Minor league team to allow dogs at every home game

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A lot of major and minor league teams have “Bark at the Park” days or some other branded promotion in which they allow fans to bring dogs to the game. They may happen one or two times a year. Maybe someone does it monthly. I have no idea.

I don’t believe, however, that any team has ever allowed dogs at the ballpark for every single game. But there is one now: the Indians affiliate in the Carolina League, the Lynchburg Hillcats. The announced a wide-ranging partnership with the local Humane Society. But it extends beyond fund raisers and banners:

Along with the partnership, City Stadium will become a dog-friendly ballpark throughout the 2017 season, meaning Hillcats fans can bring their canines to all home games.

“As far as I know, we will be the first 100-percent dog-friendly ballpark for an entire season,” said Jones. “Virtually every team holds a ‘Bark in the Park’ Day at this point, and they are extremely popular with fans. In past years, the Hillcats have hosted more than one of these in the same season, which caused us as a staff to ask why we couldn’t do it more. Expanding ‘Bark in the Park’ to every home game seemed like a fun way to help grow awareness and signify this partnership with the Lynchburg Humane Society.”

Good for the dogs. Dogs enjoy everything. You could take them to a bad opera and they’d thank you. You could take them to your tax audit and they’d be so excited they couldn’t stand it. As such, taking them someplace fun like a baseball game is a wonderful treat.

Still, I really wish Lynchburg would do a more name-appropriate thing and make every day a cat-friendly day at the ballpark.

[Craig looks around his living room and sees four cats destroying things, licking their butts and then looking up at him with sheer and utter disdain]

Hurm. On second thought, let’s just leave the ballpark for the dogs, OK?

 

Cubs designate Brett Anderson for assignment

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The Cubs announced on Wednesday that pitcher Brett Anderson was activated from the 60-day disabled list and subsequently designated for assignment to open up a spot on the 40-man roster.

Anderson, 29, had been out since May 7 with a lower back strain. Across six starts prior to the injury, the lefty yielded 20 earned runs on 34 hits and 12 walks with 16 strikeouts in 22 innings. He has logged just 33 1/3 innings over the last two seasons and has crossed the 50-inning threshold just since dating back to 2011.

Despite his lengthy injury history, Anderson will likely still draw some interest once he becomes a free agent as he throws with his left hand and can be had for the major league minimum salary.

Dilson Herrera has season-ending surgery

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Reds infielder Dilson Herrera will undergo surgery to remove bone spurs from his right shoulder. His season is over.

Herrera, you may recall, was acquired from the Mets in the Jay Bruce trade last year. He played in 49 games for the Mets, but spent all of last year and this year in the minors. In parts of seven minor league seasons he’s hit .295/.357/.461 with 67 homers and 87 stolen bases in 631 games.

Herrera, one time a top-5 prospect of the Mets, was expected to play in the bigs this year, but hasn’t. He was expected to challenge for the starting second base job for the Reds next year, but that’s obviously in doubt now. The worst part: he’ll be out of minor league options next year, so the Reds will be pressured to either put him on the big league roster fresh off an injury or else risk losing him via waivers, which I suspect he’d be unlikely to clear.