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Hot yoga caused Hunter Pence to smash some dude’s car

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Sometimes the headlines are enough. In this case I promise you that it is in no way misleading.

The story comes from closer Mark Melancon over at the Players Tribune. Today he writes about how he came to sign with the San Francisco Giants. A key part of that was the lobbying of Giants outfielder Hunter Pence, who was a teammate of Melancon’s with the Astros back in the day. By means of introduction, Melancon tells a story about how he took Pence to his first yoga class. It was one of those hot yoga classes, where they turn the temperature of the room up to 100 degrees.

Intense stuff and, as Melancon reminds us, Pence is an intense dude. So intense with the yoga that it ended up being a matter for collision repair. Go read it to find out why.

The rest of the column is pretty good too. Lots of the usual Players Tribune stuff, of course — what a coincidence that the guy just signed with a team he has always respected and which plays in a stadium he loves! — but with a funny bit about how Giants fans treat opposing relief pitchers in those baseline bullpens at AT&T Park. I never knew that, and it made me smile to learn it.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.