Getty Images

Top 25 Baseball Stories of 2016 — #4: David Ortiz’s historic farewell season

13 Comments

We’re a few short days away from 2017 so it’s a good time to look back at the top 25 baseball stories of 2016. Some of them took place on the field, some of them off the field and some of them were creatures of social media, fan chatter and the like. No matter where the story broke, however, these were the stories baseball fans were talking about most this past year.

David Ortiz actually announced his retirement in November 2015, nearly a year before he’d play his final game. The mere announcement was itself a big story — I ranked it the #20 story of the year — and his retirement still would’ve been notable if, like most players, he went out with a whimper in his final season.

He did not go out with a whimper.

At the age of 40, Ortiz put up numbers which wouldn’t have looked out of place a decade earlier. His batting line: .315/.401/.620, leading the majors in OPS, while smacking 38 homers and 48 doubles while driving in 127, with those latter two totals leading the American League. He won the Hank Aaron Award, the Edgar Martinez Award, the Silver Slugger Award, made the All-Star team and came in sixth in MVP balloting, all while powering an offense that helped the Red Sox win the AL East with a 93-69 record. It was probably the greatest season a 40-year-old player has ever had.

It may also have served to put him over the top when it comes to his Hall of Fame candidacy. Personally, I think Ortiz was a Hall of Famer no matter what he did in 2016, but many had reservations due to his being a DH — even the greatest DH ever, Edgar Martinez, is on the outside looking in for some dumb reason — and because he was allegedly one of the players who tested positive in the 2003 survey drug testing conducted by Major League Baseball in order to determine if mandatory testing should be implemented.

In early October, Rob Manfred seemed to nip that latter point in the bud, saying that the Hall of Fame should not take 2003 survey test results into account. Whether the voters will listen to him is an open question, but those comments, along with a greater thawing of anti-PED sentiment we’re witnessing in current Hall of Fame voting, may negate PEDs as an issue for Ortiz by the time he’s up for election in 2022.

As for the former: by the time David Ortiz is up for election, the DH will be half a century old and one would hope people would be over it by then. That aside, they will be faced with the candidacy of a man who was the biggest star on the best Boston Red Sox teams in the franchise’s history. A man whose name could not be left out if one wished to tell the story of baseball in the first part of the 21st century. A man who went out on top as one of the biggest fan favorites the game has ever seen while hitting 541 career homers, posting a career line of .286/.380/.552, winning three World Series rings, appearing in ten All-Star Games and compiling numbers better than the average for a Hall of Fame hitter.

I think that’ll do.

Steven Matz likely to start season on DL; Zack Wheeler to adhere to innings limit

Joe Robbins/Getty Images
2 Comments

Mets manager Terry Collins said on Wednesday, “It’s unlikely that [Steven Matz] will start the season with us.” The final spot in the Mets’ starting rotation will go to either Zack Wheeler or Seth Lugo, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports.

On Wheeler’s innings limit, assistant GM John Ricco said, “There’s going to be some number but we don’t exactly know what that is.” Wheeler missed the last two seasons after undergoing Tommy John surgery.

Neither Wheeler nor Lugo have had terrific springs as each carries a 5.11 and 5.56 Grapefruit League ERA, respectively. However, Carig notes that Wheeler has impressed simply by appearing healthy and brandishing a fastball that once again sits in the mid- to high-90’s. Lugo, meanwhile, proved crucial to the Mets last year, posting a 2.67 ERA across eight starts and nine relief appearances.

Rockies sign 30-year lease to stay in Coors Field

Bart Young/Getty Images
7 Comments

Nick Groke of the Denver Post reports that the Rockies agreed to a $200 million, 30-year lease with the Metropolitan Baseball Stadium District, which is the state division that owns Coors Field. As part of the deal, the Rockies will lease and develop a plot of land south of the stadium, which will cost the team $125 million for 99 years.

As Groke points out, had the Rockies not reached a deal by Thursday, March 30, the lease would have rolled over for five more years.

Rockies owner Dick Monfort issued a statement, saying, “We are proud that Coors Field will continue to be a vital part of a vibrant city, drawing fans from near and far and making our Colorado residents proud.”

The Rockies moved into Coors Field in 1995. It is the National League’s third oldest stadium. In that span of time, the Rockies have made the playoffs three times, the last coming in 2009 when they lost in the NLDS to the Phillies. The Rockies were swept in the 2007 World Series by the Red Sox.