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Top 25 Baseball Stories of 2016 — #16: Bud Selig gets elected to the Hall of Fame

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We’re a few short days away from 2017 so it’s a good time to look back at the top 25 baseball stories of 2016. Some of them took place on the field, some of them off the field and some of them were creatures of social media, fan chatter and the like. No matter where the story broke, however, these were the stories baseball fans were talking about most this past year.

This is the most recent entry on our list, and it’s the sort of “a thing that happens every year” story that doesn’t necessarily make for big news. But Bud Selig being inducted into the Hall of Fame, as he was in early December, may have some repercussions that are bigger than the event itself.

As for the facts: there was no surprise whatsoever that the new version of the Veterans Committee — The Today’s Game Committee — elected Selig. Selig sat on the Hall of Fame board for years and the Hall of Fame has a vested interest in keeping Major League Baseball happy. It was certainly going to elect Selig in as soon as possible and it did just that.

It did that despite the fact that Selig was an accomplice to a literal criminal conspiracy that harmed people’s livelihoods and, in turn, compromised the product on the field. Despite the fact that he launched a disastrous, cynical and greed-inspired labor war that cost us the 1994 season and World Series. Despite the fact that willfully turned a blind eye to steroid and performance enhancing drug use in the game and then turned around and vilified and scapegoated the players who used those drugs in a comically grandstanding and self-serving manner. He may have been baseball’s best commissioner ever, but that doesn’t mean he’s entitled to make the Hall of Fame. The guy did a lot of harm to the institution he was tasked with leading. That baseball’s revenues helped make people forget about it all doesn’t change what he did.

But, as I said: repercussions. At the moment it appears that two figures who have long been shunned in Hall of Fame voting — Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens — are seeing a big uptick in their support among BBWAA voters, who will cast their ballots by the end of week. The reason many are stating for changing their votes in Bonds’ and Clemens’ favor: Selig’s election. If the man whose negligence and turning a blind eye to PED use in baseball until it became a PR problem for him is in Cooperstown, why should we bar the door to PED users themselves?

Seeing Bud Selig get inducted to the Hall next Cooperstown is going to bug me a bit. But if that makes it possible for two of the best players in baseball history to get their overdue inductions sometime down the road, it’s worth it.

Mets activate Travis d’Arnaud, place Tommy Milone on disabled list

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The Mets announced on Wednesday that catcher Travis d'Arnaud has been activated from the 10-day disabled list and pitcher Tommy Milone has been placed on the 10-day DL.

d’Arnaud, 28, was placed on the DL on May 5 (retroactive to May 3) with a bone bruise on his right wrist. The Mets’ backstop appeared to have suffered the injury in mid-April when he accidentally hit his hand on the bat of the opposing hitter when he was making a throw. d’Arnaud resumes with a .203/.288/.475 triple-slash line with four home runs and 16 RBI in 66 plate appearances.

Milone, 30, made three mostly forgettable starts for the Mets, yielding 15 runs (14 earned) on 19 hits and seven walks with 12 strikeouts in 12 innings. Newsday’s Marc Carig says that, with Milone out, either Rafael Montero or Josh Smoker will start on Saturday with Smoker being more likely to get the nod.

Report: John Farrell may be on the hot seat

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The Red Sox, who won the AL East last season with a 93-69 record, have under-performed so far this season, entering Wednesday’s action with just two more wins than losses at 23-21. The club hasn’t had a winning streak of more than two games since April 15-18. As a result, manager John Farrell may be on the hot seat, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reported on Tuesday.

Beyond the mediocre record, Rosenthal cites two incidents that happened this season that caused Farrell’s stock to drop. The first was the brouhaha with the Orioles when Manny Machado slid into Dustin Pedroia at second base, causing Pedroia to suffer an injury. When reliever Matt Barnes intentionally threw a fastball at Machado, Pedroia was seen telling Machado, “It wasn’t me. It’s them.” The word “them,” of course, would ostensibly be referring to Barnes and Farrell.

The second incident happened last week when pitcher Drew Pomeranz challenged Farrell in the dugout after being removed with a pitch count of 97. Rosenthal suggests that some of Farrell’s players aren’t on the same page as the skipper.

Rosenthal also mentions that Farrell didn’t have the entire backing of the Red Sox clubhouse in 2013, when the club won the World Series. So the issues this year may not be unique; they may be part of a larger trend.

The biggest impediment in making a managerial change for the Red Sox is having a good candidate. After letting Torey Lovullo leave after last season to manage the Diamondbacks, the team’s two most likely interim candidates would be bench coach Gary DiSarcina and third base coach Brian Butterfield. DiSarcina has one year of managing experience above Single-A (Triple-A Pawtucket in 2013). Butterfield hasn’t managed in 15 years.