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Aroldis Chapman disagreed with Joe Maddon’s use of him in the playoffs

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In an earlier post today I talked about how two things can be true at the same time. Here are two things that are both true: 1. Joe Maddon and the Cubs won the World Series; and 2. Joe Maddon didn’t optimally deploy Aroldis Chapman in the World Series.

I hope people can get their head around that, because it seems pretty obvious. He was used far too long with a big lead someone else could’ve protected in Game 6 and was obviously gassed in Game 7 as a result. Was it somewhat understandable that he wanted to nail down Game 6 in no uncertain terms? Sure. Did it all work out fine? Yes, of course it did. But it was still pretty riksy, many who know what they are talking about questioned it both at the time and after the fact and Maddon continues to be asked about it. With good reason.

Today Aroldis Chapman, his deal with the Yankees official, met the New York press. And he echoed the criticism of Joe Maddon:

Despite all of the criticism Maddon has received, it’s unusual for it to actually come from a player. Typically, even if a manager is hacking a pitcher’s arm off with a rusty chainsaw (figuratively speaking), the pitcher will say “I’m just doin’ what my manager asks of me and trying to help the ballclub win.” Thats often BS — and, like I said, I agree with Chapman’s assessment here — but it is notable that he’s saying it publicly. I’m guessing this will lead to a new round of people asking Maddon for comment on it all.

Which, in keeping with the two-things-can-be-true ethos, he would be totally justified in answering via fax on “2016 World Series Champion” stationary with a cover sheet made out of press clippings of Chapman’s $86 million deal. That stuff works both ways, you know.

Brian Dozier, Todd Frazier, and Didi Gregorius say teams should expand protective netting

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Earlier, a young fan was struck by a foul ball at Yankee Stadium and had to be carried out before being taken to a hospital. Fortunately, it seems that the fan is okay.

As usual, when a scary incident such as today’s occurs, players come out in full support of expanding the protective netting at ballparks. Twins second baseman Brian Dozier as well as Yankees third baseman Todd Frazier and shortstop Didi Gregorius all said as much after Wednesday afternoon’s game.

Phillies shortstop Freddy Galvis has also been a very vocal proponent of increased netting. For the most part, the players are pretty much all in agreement about the subject. It’s only a vocal minority of fans who seem to think that their ability to snag a random souvenir or have an unimpeded view supersedes the safety of their neighbors.

Video: Giancarlo Stanton hits a laser for his 56th home run

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Marlins outfielder Giancarlo Stanton continued his march towards 60 home runs, hitting No. 56 in Wednesday afternoon’s win against the Mets. The Marlins, leading 7-2 prior to Stanton’s two-run blast in the bottom of the eighth, didn’t need the extra run support but welcomed it all the same. Mets reliever Erik Goeddel tossed a 1-1, 78 MPH curve that caught too much of the plate.

After Wednesday’s action, Stanton is batting .279/.378/.634 with 120 RBI and 116 runs scored along with the 56 dingers in 646 plate appearances. The last player to hit at least 56 home runs in a season was Ryan Howard (58) in 2006. Stanton’s is the 19th player-season of at least 56 homers.