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What a non-traditional major league job seeker faces

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I received this email after posting the John Coppolella piece a little while ago. It’s, from a young man who is trying to get into Major League Baseball but who has had to deal with the sorts of hurdles I talked about in the previous article. Specifically: he’s not rich, he has life responsibilities and he can’t simply leap into a job which would require him to live like a frat kid from the Ivy Leagues well into his 20s in order to make it all work out.

A couple of minor details were altered to protect the writer’s identity, but it’s 99% verbatim:

I’m a 19 year old of Latin American descent. I am already engaged to be married, so my situation is just totally different and unusual. I want to work in baseball ops eventually, and I’m looking for minor league video internships at the moment. My fiancée and I are willing to move anywhere just to get my baseball career started.

We went to the Winter Meetings last week and were there for all four days on our very last dollar. We didn’t even have money to buy dinner so we’re going to be overdue on all of our credit cards pretty soon. But you know what? Whatever. We’re gonna make this work.

In D.C., I interviewed with three teams. Every kid/adult or whatever you wanna call them, was white. They were all white, with expensive degrees. I spoke to four guys who were interviewing with one of the teams I was and they all BRAGGED about how their parents had enough money to pay for their apartment/car/insurance and whatever comes with moving for a job.

What about me? I can’t do that. We’re living off refund checks, and McDonald’s for dinner. But who cares? I know this is going to work one way or another. I have my contacts and all that BS. But at the end of the day, will a team hire a young Latin American kid who wants to learn, wants to guarantee his fiancée a better life down the road, and wants to help his own family eventually, or will they hire the 24-year-old in a slick suit who graduated from Yale with a degree in economics and can live in the office 24 hours a day with no outside responsibilities? Easy answer. I don’t fault teams for hiring qualified candidates. But I really don’t know why they sit there and gripe about diversity problems when the answer is right in front them.

Just wanted to share my thoughts with you man. There are people like me who want to work in baseball, but aren’t as privileged as other kids.

I’ve been going to the Winter Meetings for eight years and I talk to job seekers at every one of them. This is not the first time I’ve heard a story similar to this one.

As I said before: Major League Baseball is under no obligation to change its practices. If it feels that paying low wages to entry level people who are willing to take extraordinary measures or, alternatively, have a support system to help them make it all work is a successful practice, they can obviously continue to do so.

What they cannot do is throw their hands up in the air and ask why they keep attracting the same sorts of employees and why they are missing out on hires with more diverse backgrounds, however one wishes to define diversity.

And That Happened: Thursday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Tigers 13, Orioles 8: Leonys Martin hit a grand slam out of the leadoff spot and the two-slot hitter, Jeimer Candelario, drove in three via a two-run homer and an RBI single. They play for the Tigers, by the way. Figure a lot of you were not aware of that. Heck, outside of Miguel Cabrera, Victor Martinez and Nick Castellanos, figure most of us don’t know most of the guys on the Tigers anymore. You do know that Manny Machado plays for the Orioles. Know that he hit two homers in a losing cause. Know that, given how the Orioles are doing these days, he won’t be with the Orioles too much longer, I reckon.

Cubs 8, Cardinals 5: Chicago built an early 6-1 lead on a bunch of singles and sac flies and stuff and Jason Heyward capped the Cubs scoring with a two-run homer in the fifth. Jon Lester allowed only an unearned run over six. Every Cubs starter had at least one hit. Anthony Rizzo had three. Heyward, Kyle Schwarber and Javier Baez had two a piece. After the game Joe Maddon said:

“This is so much fun to watch. Keep your launch angles, keep your exit velocities, give me a good at-bat. Seeing inside the ball, using the whole field. With that you’ll see better situational hitting, better batting average. That’s just good hitting.”

Without looking, I’m going to guess that the Cubs’ eight-run outburst was, at least in part, a function of good launch angles and exit velocities. Not that Maddon would be the first person to engage in the fallacy of assuming mutual exclusivity where it does not exist.

Astros 9, Mariners 2: Charlie Morton tossed seven shutout innings, dropping his ERA down to 0.72 in his three wins. He has also struck out 33 guys in 25 innings and has walked only six. At this rate he’s going to be in a three-way race with two of his teammates — Gerrit Cole and Justin Verlander — for the Cy Young. Seattle dropped three of four in the series and, as a team, went 15-for-100 against Dallas KeuchelLance McCullers Jr., Cole and Morton.

Yankees 4, Blue Jays 3: Aaron Judge homered and, while the Jays threatened late when David Robertson couldn’t find the strike zone and loaded the bases with no outs in the eighth, but he got out of the jam with only one run scoring. Judge — who a lot of you wise acres thought would struggle this year now that everyone is ready for him — is hitting .339/.481/.629 and is on a 48-homer, 152-walk pace. So, yeah.

Phillies 7, Pirates 0: OK, I think Jake Arrieta has finally finished his late spring training. Here he tossed seven shutout innings, allowing only one hit and striking out ten. Rhys Hoskins homered, Odubel Herrera singled in runs in the second and the fifth, J.P. Crawford and Cesar Hernandez knocked in runs on singles as well. More importantly, look at the photo on the top of this post and acknowledge how spiffy Philly looked in these blues. Their only fault is that teams that do this should, like the White Sox the other day, wear the blues on the road as originally intended.

Braves 12, Mets 4: Matt Wisler was called up from Triple-A to make a spot start. Guessing he’s going to get a bit more than that after allowing only two hits in seven innings. Matt Harvey, meanwhile, allowed six runs in six innings and after the game Mickey Calloway would not commit to him making his next scheduled start. He’s just not the guy he used to be. Preston Tucker drove in five with a bases loaded double and a two-run double. Kurt Suzuki had three hits and drove in three runs, including a two-run homer. The Braves offense leads the NL in runs scored. We were all expecting that heading into the season, yes?

Brewers 12, Marlins 3: It was close until the sixth, when Milwaukee put up a seven-spot. Lorenzo Cain homered, doubled twice and scored four times and Ryan Braun hit a pinch-hit, three-run homer. Those three runs gave him 1,000 RBI on his career. Lewis Brinson — who came over to the Marlins from the Brewers in the offseason trade for Christian Yelich — hit his first two career homers.

Diamondbacks 3, Giants 1: Zack Greinke held the punchless Giants to one run over seven innings, with a Brandon Belt homer being his only blemish. The Snakes got homers from Ketel Marte and A.J. Pollock. The Giants have scored only 51 runs in 18 games. That’s the lowest run total in baseball, tied with the Royals, who have only played 16 games. It ain’t 2014 anymore, is it?

Red Sox 8, Angels 2: And the Red Sox never lost again. Homers from Mookie Betts and Andrew Benintendi. Eight runs on 14 hits against six pitchers. A fine outing from Eduardo Rodriguez. Seven wins in a row and, heck, even though it covers the whole season, 16 of 18 for Boston.