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One sportswriter’s terrible, horrible, no good, very bad Hall of Fame ballot

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The 2017 Hall of Fame ballot has no shortage of deserving inductees. Among those still on the ballot are Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Trevor Hoffman, Curt Schilling, Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds, Edgar Martinez, Mike Mussina, Lee Smith, Fred McGriff, Jeff Kent, Larry Walker, Gary Sheffield, Billy Wagner, and Sammy Sosa. New to the ballot are Ivan Rodriguez, Manny Ramirez, Vladimir Guerrero, Mike Cameron, J.D. Drew, Jorge Posada, Magglio Ordonez, Derrek Lee, Tim Wakefield, Edgar Renteria, Melvin Mora, Carlos Guillen, Casey Blake, Jason Varitek, Orlando Cabrera, Pat Burrell, Freddy Sanchez, Arthur Rhodes, and Matt Stairs.

Even if one is a “small Hall” kind of person, one would have a very difficult time filling out the ballot without the maximum 10 players. One sportswriter, however, found it rather simple. Steven Marcus of Newsday voted for only two players: Vladimir Guerrero and Trevor Hoffman.

No Jeff Bagwell, no Tim Raines, no Edgar Martinez, no Ivan Rodriguez, not even a Manny Ramirez. By JAWS, Jay Jaffe’s Hall of Fame metric, Guerrero and Hoffman rank 12th and 26th of the 34 eligible players, respectively. Marcus having only two players on his ballot is criminal enough, but to have his best player rank 12th by this metric is also abominable.

Marcus didn’t offer much in the way of justification in his column and he hasn’t tweeted about it, either.

One wonders if the Baseball Writers Association of America give those voting privileges to someone who will appreciate it more.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.