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Last three AL pennant winners and the St. Louis Cardinals get competitive balance picks

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Competitive Balance draft picks are additional draft picks, occurring at the end of the first and second rounds of the Rule 4 draft each summer, given to clubs with the 10 lowest revenues and in the 10 smallest markets. They used to be determined by lottery, but now, with the new Collective Bargaining Agreement, they are determined via formula in which revenue and winning percentage are mashed up and an order is determined ranking the allegedly poor sisters of Major League Baseball.

I say allegedly because, with scant few exceptions, we have no idea what teams make and how bad off they are financially. We can guess, with some degree of certainty, to be fair, which teams are worse off than others, but we really don’t know. I also say it because since the Competitive Balance picks thing was put into place, there are always a couple of head-scratching inclusions in baseball’s draft pick charity program.

Via MLB.com, here is this year’s Competitive Balance draft order. Group A will pick at the end of the first round and before the second round. Group B will pick after the second round and before the third. These picks are in addition to whatever picks they will get based on their finish in the 2016 standings. The number is where the pick appears in the draft overall:

Round A
31. Tampa Bay Rays
32. Cincinnati Reds
33. Oakland Athletics
34. Milwaukee Brewers
35. Minnesota Twins
36. Miami Marlins

Round B
67. Arizona Diamondbacks
68. San Diego Padres
69. Colorado Rockies
70. Cleveland Indians
71. Kansas City Royals
72. Pittsburgh Pirates
73. Baltimore Orioles
74. St. Louis Cardinals

As has been mentioned many, many times over the years, it’s weird to see the Cardinals here. Yes, St. Louis is small, but the Cardinals are, without question, a team with large, regional appeal which makes a lot of money and which, obviously, has had tremendous success over the years. Theo Epstein once famously groused about it, saying that St. Louis is “probably the last organization in baseball that needs that kind of (an) annual gift.” He has a point.

It’s also odd to see both the Indians and the Royals there, given that they have combined to win the last three American League pennants, with the Royals winning the 2015 World Series. Not that I will not grant that both of them are at a financial disadvantage to many other teams in baseball.

But that’s the thing, right? The financial disadvantage? If that’s the issue being addressed here, it makes little sense to deal with it via extra draft picks because the draft is the one place where clubs aren’t at a tremendous disadvantage compared to others. Draft pick bonuses are slotted now, capping the amount any one team can pay a player, eliminating the old practice of draft picks signaling to poorer teams not to pick them. Beyond that, the draft represents a very low percentage of a team’s overall outlay for talent and thus is one place where low revenue/small market teams are least disadvantaged compared to their bigger richer peers. If anything, these guys could use straight cash for free agents or operating expenses, not extra draft picks.

Oh well. It’s the system we have.

Video: Jaime Garcia hits a 399-foot grand slam

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Jaime Garcia has been at the center of trade talks for several days now, but on Friday night, he commanded center stage for an entirely different reason. The Braves’ southpaw went head-to-head with Dodgers’ lefty Alex Wood and mashed his first career grand slam: a two-out, 399-foot blast that cleared the wall in right field and put the Braves up 9-0 in the fifth inning.

The bases-loaded knock was the third career home run for Garcia, whose contributions at the plate have been few and far between over his nine-year track in the major leagues. Not only did the homer mark an impressive career first for the 30-year-old, but it was just the second pitcher grand slam in Braves’ history and the first since 1966.

Garcia looked almost as impressive on the mound during Friday’s series opener, issuing one run, four hits and three strikeouts through his first six innings. The Braves currently lead the Dodgers 12-1 in the top of the seventh inning.

As for whether the slam will affect negotiations between the Braves and Twins? MLB.com’s Mike Petriello put it best:

Ryon Healy exits game after taking a ground ball to the face

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Athletics’ first baseman Ryon Healy had a scary moment during Friday’s loss to the Mets. Lucas Duda smacked a single to the first base side, where the ball took a high hop and caught Healy in the left temple. He crumpled to the ground after getting struck by the one-hopper, but was eventually able to stand and walk off the field with assistance from a trainer.

Prior to the injury, Healy went 2-for-3 at the plate with an RBI single in the first inning. He was replaced by Yonder Alonso, who finished off the rest of the night’s 7-5 loss with a walk in two plate appearances.

Following the game, manager Bob Melvin told reporters that Healy did not appear to have sustained a concussion as a result of the hit. Healy said he thinks he’ll be good to go for Saturday’s game, though a final decision likely won’t be made until tomorrow.