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Mariners to sign reliever Marc Rzepczynski

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Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mariners “on the verge” of signing free agent left-hander Marc Rzepczynski. Which seems to be a dramatic way to characterize a signing of a guy like Marc Rzepczynski — “verges” seem like something preceding audacious moves — but we’ll let Ken have this one, as it’s the holidays.

Rzepczynski, whose name has only been typed once, by a Toronto beat writer back in 2009, and since then has only been copied and pasted, spent 2016 with the Athletics and Nationals. The 31-year-old lefty specialist has handled lefty batters to the tune of .222/.291/.298 for his career and, as a result, one may reasonably presume that he will pitch for another 30-35 seasons.

Rosenthal says there are only a few “last-minute details to cover” before the agreement with Seattle is made official.

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Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.