ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 03: Los Angeles Dodgers owner Mark Walter during Game One of the National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on October 3, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia.  (Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)
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The Dodgers need to cut payroll after reaching $1 billion in player spending

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If there’s any threat to the Dodgers’ ability to contend in 2017, it’s the size of their payroll. Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that the team spent approximately $1.181 billion in four years and needs to reduce their debt if they plan to comply with league rules. Shaikin adds that the debt is currently estimated to be in the “hundreds of millions.”

On average, the Dodgers have dumped an annual $295 million into player payroll dating back through 2013, when Guggenheim Baseball Management assumed control of the club. The expenditures were assumed to be a necessary part of the team’s efforts to stay competitive while remodeling their player development program. It’s this mentality that gives Dodgers’ ownership some comfort heading into the 2017 season. Via Shaikin:

So while the Dodgers would have to pay big in order to keep established stars such as third baseman Justin Turner and closer Kenley Jansen from signing elsewhere as free agents, the club says it otherwise is able to operate more efficiently because it has a minor league system that is churning out the young, relatively inexpensive talent necessary to sustain a perennial contender.

Retaining Turner and Jansen won’t come cheap, as the two figure to be in the top tier of free agents this offseason.

MLB debt service rules stipulate that a team cannot exceed “12 times annual revenue, minus expenses,” and all teams under new ownership must adhere to the guidelines within a five-year period. Any organization found in violation of the debt service rule can be subject to one of 16 disciplinary options, the most extreme requiring a suspension of ownership and management.

No details on how the Dodgers will reduce their mountain of debt have been released, but neither club ownership nor MLB commissioner Rob Manfred appears overly concerned about the team’s ability to compete for another NL West title while cutting their expenses.

I think the Dodgers will be in a position that they can comply with our expectations in terms of the debt service rule, without any dramatic alteration in the kind of product they have been putting on the field,” Manfred said.

Blue Jays sign Steve Pearce to a two-year deal

NEW YORK - MAY 09: Steve Pearce #28 of the Baltimore Orioles looks on from the dugout during the game against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on May 9, 2015 in the Bronx borough of New York City. (Photo by Rob Tringali/SportsChrome/Getty Images)
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Buster Olney of ESPN reports that the Blue Jays have signed Steve Pearce to a two-year deal worth $12.5 million.

Pearce, 33 had some health issues in 2016, but he hit .288/.374/.492 across 302 plate appearances when he was on the field and he mashes lefties in particular. Pearce is versatile as well, logging time at first base, second base, right field, left field, and DH in 2016 while splitting time between the Rays and Orioles.

Jung Ho Kang’s DUI arrest was his third since 2009

PITTSBURGH, PA - JUNE 10:  Jung Ho Kang #27 of the Pittsburgh Pirates fields a ground ball in the second inning during the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at PNC Park on June 10, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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Last week Pirates infielder Jung Ho Kang was arrested in South Korea for driving under the influence of alcohol and leaving the scene of an accident. That’s bad, but it turns out that it’s nothing new. The Yonhapnews Agency reports that Kang has been arrested for DUI three times since 2009:

Gangnam Police Station in southern Seoul confirmed that it was Kang’s third DUI arrest, with the three strikes law resulting in the immediate revocation of his license. According to police, Kang had also been arrested for a DUI in August 2009 and May 2011. No personal injuries were reported in either case, though he’d caused property damage in the latter incident.

The report also notes that a companion of Kang initially claimed that he, and not Kang, was behind the wheel at the time of the accident which led to Kang’s arrest last week. It was later revealed by the car’s black box, however, that Kang was driving. So add in some obstruction of justice, whether it is charged or not, to the scene. Police are investigating that.

Between all of this and the fact that Kang is under investigation for an alleged sexual assault in Chicago this past season, a pretty ugly portrait of the Pirates’ infielder is beginning to reveal itself.