Getty Images

Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Ralph Branca dies at 90

6 Comments

Ralph Branca, the Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher most famous for giving up the home run which came to be known as “The Shot Heard `Round the World,” has died at the age of 90. Former big league manager Bobby Valentine, who is Branca’s son in law, announced the news on Twitter, saying that Branca died early this morning at a nursing home in Rye, New York.

Though the homer Branca gave up to Bobby Thomson of the Giants in the 1951 NL playoff was always going to lead his obituary, it’s a disservice to the man and his career to let that shot solely define him. Branca pitched in the big leagues for 12 years, as both a starter and a reliever, and he was pretty darn good. The three-time All-Star compiled a record of 88-68 and an ERA of 3.79 and a K/BB ratio of 829/663 in 1,484 innings. He pitched in 322 games, 188 of which came as a starter. He received MVP consideration in 1947 and 1948, winning 21 games and posting an ERA of 2.67 as a swingman in the former year, his best in the bigs.

Also of note: Branca was the last surviving member of the 1947 Dodgers, the team on which Jackie Robinson made his debut, breaking the color barrier. Branca was a pallbearer at Robinson’s funeral.

Unlike a lot of players who are known more for their mistakes than their greatness, Branca was never bitter about that homer he gave up to Thomson in 1951. He and Thomson became friends and they would make joint appearances together, with Branca willingly autographing photos of the homer. Years later, it was revealed that the 1951 Giants had a system rigged up to steal signs and relay them to the batters. For his part, Thomson said he was too busy concentrating on the situation to see the sign relayed to him. Branca always took the high road, refusing to relitigate the matter, saying that even if Thomson knew what was coming, he still had to hit, and that’s not easy.

It’s an overused phrase, especially by sports writers, but Branca was truly a class act. Rest in peace, number 13.

UPDATE: Commissioner Rob Manfred has issued a statement on Branca’s passing:

“I extend my deepest condolences to the family, friends and fellow admirers of Ralph Branca, a three-time All-Star, a friend of Jackie Robinson and a former President and board member of the Baseball Assistance Team.  Ralph was a true gentleman who earned universal respect in the game he loved and served so well.  Ralph’s participation in the ‘Shot Heard ‘Round the World’ was eclipsed by the grace and sportsmanship he demonstrated following one of the game’s signature moments.  He is better remembered for his dedication to the members of the baseball community.  He was an inspiration to so many of us.

“On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my best wishes to Ralph’s wife Ann, his daughter Mary, his son-in-law Bobby Valentine and his many friends throughout the National Pastime.”

 

Video: Jaime Garcia hits a 399-foot grand slam

4 Comments

Jaime Garcia has been at the center of trade talks for several days now, but on Friday night, he commanded center stage for an entirely different reason. The Braves’ southpaw went head-to-head with Dodgers’ lefty Alex Wood and mashed his first career grand slam: a two-out, 399-foot blast that cleared the wall in right field and put the Braves up 9-0 in the fifth inning.

The bases-loaded knock was the third career home run for Garcia, whose contributions at the plate have been few and far between over his nine-year track in the major leagues. Not only did the homer mark an impressive career first for the 30-year-old, but it was just the second pitcher grand slam in Braves’ history and the first since 1966.

Garcia looked almost as impressive on the mound during Friday’s series opener, issuing one run, four hits and three strikeouts through his first six innings. The Braves currently lead the Dodgers 12-1 in the top of the seventh inning.

As for whether the slam will affect negotiations between the Braves and Twins? MLB.com’s Mike Petriello put it best:

Ryon Healy exits game after taking a ground ball to the face

Getty Images
2 Comments

Athletics’ first baseman Ryon Healy had a scary moment during Friday’s loss to the Mets. Lucas Duda smacked a single to the first base side, where the ball took a high hop and caught Healy in the left temple. He crumpled to the ground after getting struck by the one-hopper, but was eventually able to stand and walk off the field with assistance from a trainer.

Prior to the injury, Healy went 2-for-3 at the plate with an RBI single in the first inning. He was replaced by Yonder Alonso, who finished off the rest of the night’s 7-5 loss with a walk in two plate appearances.

Following the game, manager Bob Melvin told reporters that Healy did not appear to have sustained a concussion as a result of the hit. Healy said he thinks he’ll be good to go for Saturday’s game, though a final decision likely won’t be made until tomorrow.