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The Citizens Bank Park “Pistachio Girl” . . . is a white nationalist

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A lot of ballparks have colorful vendors. We’ve talked about the Spring Training/Diamondbacks’ vendor who does the “Lemonade, lemonade like grandma made!” thing in the past. The Tigers used to have a hot dog guy who sang opera as he vended. There’s a “Beer Pirate” in Pittsburgh. The list goes on and on, with many of them featured over at MLB.com in this article last year.

One of the vendors featured there was the “Pistachio Girl” of Citizens Bank Park. Her name is Emily Youcis and she’s popped up in the fringes of sports news a few times. I’ve not been to a game at Citizen’s Bank Park, but I’ve heard people talk about her. She’s a lot like any of these other colorful vendors. Some people love her, some people are somewhat annoyed. She doesn’t even sell pistachios anymore because the Phillies discontinued them so she hawks Cracker Jack. Life goes on. Either way, she came in second in the MLB.com poll for top vendor.  Check her out in action:

Despite it not being baseball season, she’s in the news today. Seems that, however colorful her vending style is, she has a favorite color: white. And that led to some difficulties for her over the weekend. From Philly.com:

A well-known Phillies vendor called “Pistachio Girl” for her melodic hawking of peanuts and Cracker Jack at Citizens Bank Park found herself in a radically different arena this weekend — in the middle of a violent street fracas outside a white-nationalism conference that she was attending in Washington, D.C.

She was an observer of the conference, not an attendee, but she tells Will Bunch of the Philadelphia Daily News that “she’s been in thrall with the so-called ‘alt-right’ movement for about 10 months.” Which she calls “a white identity movement.” She said “This doesn’t mean that we hate anybody — we simply want to find our own identity as Americans … as white Americans, and find our own culture.”

Not everyone considers “white identity movements” to be simple searches for identity, and thus you may not be surprised to learn that there were protests of the conference. The protests got ugly and Youcis got spray paint sprayed on her hair. Others suffered minor injuries which is unfortunate, no matter what ideology one harbors. One may protest whatever one desires as vehemently as one desires, but one hopes the line is drawn at physical violence.

One does wonder, however, how her Cracker Jack sales are going to go next summer given her newfound notoriety. Because, no matter what the headlines are saying about it lately, white nationalism is not exactly a super popular ideology.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.