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Curt Schilling: 2001 World Series glory hound

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We recently mentioned Joe Buck’s new autobiography. Today Vice has an excerpt of it that you may find amusing.

In Game 4 of the 2001 World Series, Curt Schilling was taken out of the game by Diamondbacks manager Bob Brenly. Brenly was mic’d up by the Fox production team and Schilling famously pleaded with Brenly to keep him in the game because he still had something left and “gamer/gritty/competitor/warrior blah, blah, blah” stuff that Schilling was known for as a player.

You may remember what happened next: the Yankees rallied off of reliever Byung-Hyun Kim to force extras and then Derek Jeter hit his famous 10th inning homer off of him. Brenly caught all kinds of hell afterward for taking Schilling out, no doubt made more severe due to Schilling’s protestations, picked up on a live mic.

Buck, however, says that that was all show. Schilling had told his catcher, Damien Miller, before the inning that he was out of gas, had one more inning at best and that Miller should not let Brenly leave Schilling in. Miller told Brenly this, so Brenly naturally came to take Schilling out when he ran into trouble. From the book:

“It was great theater. It belonged on Broadway.

Here is what we didn’t know. Earlier in that inning, Schilling had told his catcher, Damian Miller, that he was running out of gas: ‘Whatever happens, this is my last inning. Don’t let him put me back out there again.’ Naturally, Miller told Brenly.

But Schilling could see the microphone on Brenly’s uniform. He knew he would look better if he begged to keep pitching on national television. So he asked Brenly to keep him the game…They both knew he was coming out.”

As Vice’s Twitter account notes, this probably is reason enough to make one question the whole bloody sock business anew.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 13 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.

Report: Charlie Sheen has original cast on board for Major League III, looking for financial backing

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TMZ is reporting that actor Charlie Sheen has the original cast on board for Major League III but is still looking for financial backing. TMZ cites Sheen referring to the script as “dynamite.”

The original Major League came out in 1989 and debuted at No. 1 at the box office. That spurred a sequel, Major League II, which was released five years later in 1994. Despite negative reviews, II debuted at No. 1 at the box office as well. Major League: Back to the Minors was released in 1998, but tanked at the box office and received mostly negative reviews.

Given that trend, one might wonder why anyone would attempt Major League III, and one would be correct to raise that question. But it’s been 19 years since the last installment and 27 years since the original. People in their early 30’s and 40’s with nostalgia and disposable income will likely be willing to pay to relive a blast from the past. In my humble opinion, Major League is the finest of the baseball movies, so I’ll at least be curious if Sheen ends up getting financial backing.

Sheen has had, well, an interesting life in the last two decades so it’s no sure thing that people with money will trust him to stay out of trouble.