Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Mariners issue statement after catcher Steve Clevenger makes racist tweets

53 Comments

Mariners catcher Steve Clevenger found himself in hot water on social media on Thursday evening. He tweeted some racist statements pertaining to the Black Lives Matter movement. After receiving criticism, he locked his account and presumably deleted the tweets.

The Score has screen caps of both tweets Clevenger made. [One] [Two]

After being made aware of Clevenger’s tweets, the Mariners issued a statement:

In case the above tweet or image don’t show up, it reads:

The Seattle Mariners are very disappointed at the tweets posted on Steve Clevenger’s account. While he is certainly free to express himself, his tweets do not in any way represent the opinions of the Seattle Mariners. We strongly disagree with the language and tone of his comments.

We are currently examining all internal options that are available to us as we determine appropriate next steps. We will have no further comment at this time.

Kudos to the Mariners for being quick to respond to the issue.

Clevenger, 30, has played in 22 games for the Mariners this season after they acquired him from the Orioles in the Mark Trumbo trade this past offseason. Across 76 plate appearances, mostly against right-handed pitching, Clevenger has hit .221/.303/.309 with three doubles, one home run, and seven RBI.

Red Sox to activate David Price for a Monday start

Getty Images
1 Comment

Earlier today we talked about how David Price was knocked around in a minor league rehab start. Apparently he felt good while being knocked around because he’s going to make a start for the Red Sox on Monday afternoon against the White Sox.

Healthy is all that truly matters at this point, what with Drew Pomeranz struggling and Steven Wright out for the year. The Sox need someone to eat some innings at the moment. If it takes him a bit to get super sharp, well, so be it.

Games are slower, in part, because of pitcher velocity

Getty Images
4 Comments

Recently, in the wake of Noah Syndergaard‘s injury, we talked about velocity and the maximal effort exerted by pitchers in throwing each pitch. We talked about how, simply as a matter of observation, pitchers seem to take longer between pitches, in part to maximize the energy available. About how we hear them talk about “executing pitches” all the time, with each of the 90-100 pitches they make each game being treated like an individual performance, each of which can be judged as successful or not.

Today at FiveThirtyEight, Rob Arthur puts some numbers to all of that and concludes, not surprisingly, that there is a pretty strong correlation between the dramatic uptick in velocity we’ve seen over the past decade or so and the length of games, which has grown longer over that time. Seems that, yep, pitchers are taking longer precisely because doing so gives them extra ticks on the radar gun.

Indeed, Arthur finds that for every additional second pitchers take between pitches, they throw about .02 miles per hour harder. That doesn’t sound like a lot, but as Arthur demonstrates, each little bit adds up. Those seconds, over 100-150 pitchers per team per game add up in time, obviously. And, based on past research Arthur cites regarding the correlation between pitcher velocity and pitcher effectiveness, those miles per hour add up in terms of team wins.

All of which adds some spice to the whole game length/game pace debate. We’d all like to see things move along more quickly, but doing so will likely impact player effectiveness, which will in turn make it harder to get teams and players to agree to measures designed to speed things up.