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Brett Cecil finally allows an earned run, ending streak dating back to last June

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On June 21 last year, Blue Jays reliever Brett Cecil surrendered four runs in two-thirds of an inning against the Orioles, bumping his ERA up to a ghastly 5.96. That would be the last time the lefty would allow an earned run that season.

Between June 24 and October 3, Cecil appeared in 37 games and yielded only two runs, both unearned. Over 31 2/3 innings in that span of time, opposing hitters racked up a mere 17 hits and four walks while striking out 44 times. Cecil’s streak continued into 2016, as he worked a scoreless inning with two strikeouts on Monday against the Rays. 38 consecutive appearances without allowing an earned run tied him with Craig Kimbrel for the all-time record, as Sportsnet’s Ben Nicholson-Smith pointed out on Twitter. Earned runs became an official stat in 1912.

Cecil’s streak ended on Tuesday. Logan Forsythe hit a two-run home run off of Cecil in the bottom of the eighth to give the Rays a 3-2 lead. Cue “I Will Remember You” by Sarah McLachlan.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.