Settling the Score: Monday’s results

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Royals 4, Tigers 0

Johnny Cueto made his Royals home debut Monday night and threw a complete-game, four-hit shutout against the Tigers in front of 36,000 fans at Kauffman Stadium. Cueto struck out eight, walked zero, and threw 86 of 116 pitches for strikes to extend the Royals’ winning streak to four games.

Oh, and then there’s this from the Associated Press recap:

Tigers manager Brad Ausmus complained to plate umpire Joe West that Cueto’s delivery was illegal, saying Cueto was stopping in his windup.

“Really, the way the rule reads, you’re not supposed to even alter your motion,” Ausmus said. “That’s the way the rule reads. They don’t enforce it. Well, he said if he stops it’s an illegal pitch.”

It’s called The Cueto Wiggle and we’re all familiar with it, Brad.

Kansas City now has a 12-game lead in the AL Central and a 13.5-game lead over third-place Detroit.

Your box scores and AP recaps from Monday …

White Sox 8, Angels 2

Orioles 3, Mariners 2

Mets 4, Rockies 2

Diamondbacks 13, Phillies 3

Nationals 8, Dodgers 3

Padres 2, Reds 1

Must-Click Link: Sherri Nichols, Sabermetic Pioneer

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If you are old enough and lame enough as I am, you may have lurked around on sabermetic message boards in the 1990s. If you did, you may have heard of Sherri Nichols, who back in the day, was a significant contributor to the advancement of statistical analysis, particularly defensive analysis.

While it’s probably better that not everyone is as old and nerdy as me, the downside of it is that most people haven’t heard of Nichols and know nothing about her contributions. That changes today with Ben Lindbergh’s excellent analysis of Nichols and her work over at The Ringer, which I recommend that you all read.

The short version: Nichols is the one who planted the seed about on-base percentage being valuable in the mind of Baseball Prospectus Founder Gary Huckabay, back in the late 80s. She’s also the one most responsible for the rise of zone-based defensive metrics in the 1990s, such as Defensive Average, which she created and which served as the basis for other such metrics going forward. She also played a critical role in the development of RetroSheet, which collected almost all extant box score and play-by-play information going back to the turn of the 20th century, thereby making so much of the information available at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs possible. A key contribution there: making the information free and available to everyone, rather than closing the underlying data off as proprietary and either charging for access or keeping it in-house like some recent data collectors have chosen to do. Ahem.

A larger takeaway than all of Nichols’ contributions is just how loathe the baseball community was to listen to a woman back then. I mean, yeah, they’re still loathe to listen to women now, as indicated by the small number of women who hold jobs in baseball operations departments, but back then it was even worse, as evidenced by Lindbergh’s stories and Nichols’ anecdotes.

A great read and a great history lesson.