The benches cleared in Friday’s Giants-Rangers game

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Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Madison Bumgarner got mad at a player for tossing his bat in frustration. Delino DeShields popped out to second base to end the fourth inning. He was upset at himself, so he tossed his bat with some oomph. This didn’t sit well with Bumgarner, who jawed at DeShields, causing the benches to empty. He got into a shouting match with Adrian Beltre amid the altercation.

Among the players Bumgarner has taken issue with for reacting in any way at all to something that happened on the field:

  • Jesus Guzman, May 2013: Bumgarner didn’t like Guzman’s smug celebration after hitting a home run in a game he didn’t start, so he intentionally threw at Guzman the next day. [Sports Illustrated]
  • Yasiel Puig, May 2014: Bumgarner didn’t like Puig’s bat flip after he hit a home run, so he yelled at the outfielder. [San Francisco Chronicle]
  • Puig again, September 2014: Bumgarner hit Puig with a pitch and he didn’t like how Puig reacted to that, so he needlessly escalated a confrontation. [HardballTalk]
  • Alex Guerrero, April 2015: Bumgarner didn’t like Alex Guerrero expressing dissatisfaction after popping up a pitch, so he shouted, “You’re not that good” at him. [ESPN]
  • Carlos Gomez, May 2015: Bumgarner didn’t like that Gomez shouted in frustration after fouling off a pitch he thought he should have hit better, so the lefty tossed his next pitch way inside, nearly hitting Gomez. [San Francisco Chronicle]
  • Delino DeShields, July, 2015: This what one might describe as a “trend”.

Perhaps manager Bruce Bochy should have a talk with the lefty.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: