And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights


Indians 5, Mariners 3: My lord, when Corey Kluber is on, he’s on. Kluber struck out 13 in seven innings. Over his last four starts, he’s 3-0 with 50 strikeouts and two walks in 32 innings. Which, whoa.

Athletics 5, Yankees 4: The A’s were down 3-0 but battled back, with Billy Burns and Brett Lawrie homering off of CC Sabathia and Ben Zobrist drawing a bases-loaded walk from David Carpenter in the seventh. The A’s have won 10 of 11 from the Yankees in Oakland. Sort of makes Yankees fans wish that the A’s were still the Yankees’ defacto farm team. Sadly, it’s not the 1950s anymore. Or maybe not so sadly. Man, the 1950s were terrible. Just truly awful by most measures. That we think otherwise is because of rock music, Fonzie and your parents and grandparents hating and resenting the hippies and pining for a simpler time. But my god, we had awful racism, extreme social and emotional repression and that’s before you even get to the constant paranoia brought on by the threat of nuclear annihilation. Makes the Yankees stealing guys like Clete Boyer, Bobby Shantz, Ralph Terry, Art Ditmar, Ryne Duren and Roger Maris look like child’s play.

White Sox 3, Orioles 2; Orioles 6, White Sox 3: Chris Sale dominated in the first game, as we discussed yesterday. The O’s win the second. With most split doubleheaders, there is a sense of whether it was worth it. After the second game Buck Showalter reminded everyone why the Sox and O’s were there yesterday. Specifically, the Baltimore riots a few weeks back:

“Let’s keep in mind why we’re playing these two games. It was self-inflicted,” Showalter said. “I think sometimes we lose sight of why we’re doing what we’re doing today.”

Anything equally deep to add, Robin Ventura?

“Supposed to be an off day for us. We played two games,” manager Robin Ventura said. “Now we’re all tired.”

Really makes you think.

Red Sox 5, Rangers 1: Welcome to the big leagues Eduardo Rodriguez. The just-called-up-yesterday Rodriguez tossed seven and two-thirds shutout innings allowing just three hits and two walks while striking out seven. He looked close to untouchable. Josh Hamilton made his return to Texas and went 2-for-4 with a double and an RBI single.

Angels 12, Tigers 2: Chris Iannetta, Albert Pujols and Matt Joyce all homered. Iannetta’s was a grand slam. Most of the damage came against Tigers starter Buck Farmer. Which is one hell of a name if nothing else. A guy could go places with a name like Buck Farmer.

Pirates 11, Padres 5: Seven in a row for Pittsburgh, as their offense continues to click. Jung Ho Kang, Starling Marte and Gregory Polanco all went deep and Andrew McCutchen, Neil Walker and Francisco Cervelli had three hits a piece. A.J. Burnett won his fifth in a row. The Pirates dug a hole for themselves early, but the Cardinals’ injuries and inevitable regression — is it inevitable? I dunno, but go with me here — could have the Buccos back in this thing soon.

Giants 7, Braves 0: A nice duel between Chris Heston and Shelby Miller, with Heston making no mistakes and Miller’s only mistake being a homer to Brandon Belt. Then the Braves’ bullpen came in and barfed up six runs with a quickness, giving everyone license to turn the TV off early. Brandon Cunniff and Donnie Veal were the arsonists here.

Indians release Mike Napoli

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The Cleveland Indians have released Mike Napoli.

This is not terribly surprising as he was seen as a depth move to begin with. Injury insurance for Yonder Alonso at first base and Edwin Encarnacion at DH, neither of whom are injured at the moment. Napoli was on a minor league contract and the Indians made it clear that, if he can’t find a major league job elsewhere, he’s welcome to come back and cool his heels in Columbus in the event he’s needed later.

Which may be what happens if he wants to keep playing because, after a season in which he hit .193/.285/.428, and a spring in which he hit .218/.310/.431, there aren’t likely to be a ton of takers.