James Shields driven from Game 1 in the fourth inning

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Royals manager Ned Yost has gone to the bullpen early in Game 1 of the World Series, removing starter James Shields after he surrendered an RBI single to Giants designated hitter Michael Morse in the top of the fourth inning. It was the fourth run of the game for the visiting Giants, who then plated their fifth run of the night when Gregor Blanco drew a bases-loaded walk off Kansas City reliever Danny Duffy.

San Francisco will carry a 5-0 lead into the bottom of the fourth inning at a stunned Kauffman Stadium.

All five of the Giants’ runs were charged to “Big Game James,” who now has a 5.74 ERA in 53 1/3 career postseason innings and a 7.11 ERA through 19 innings in this year’s tournament. That’s not a great look for the impending free agent right-hander.

Must-Click Link: Mets owners are cheap, unaccountable and unconcerned

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Marc Carig of Newsday took Mets owners Fred and Jeff Wilpon to the woodshed over the weekend. He, quite justifiably, lambasted them for their inexplicable frugality, their seeming indifference to wanting to put a winning team on the field and, above all else, their unwillingness to level with the fans or the press about the team’s plans or priorities.

Mets ownership is unaccountable, Carig argues, asking everything of fans and giving nothing in the way of a plan or even hope in return:

Mets fans ought to know where their money is going, because it’s clear that much of it isn’t ending up on the field . . . They never talk about money. Whether it’s arrogance or simply negligence, they have no problem asking fans to pony up the cash and never show the willingness to reciprocate.

And they’re not just failing to be forthcoming with the fans. Even the front office is in the dark about the direction of the team at any given time:

According to sources, the front office has only a fuzzy idea of what they actually have to spend in any given offseason. They’re often flying blind, forced to navigate the winter under the weight of an invisible salary cap. This is not the behavior of a franchise that wants to win.

Carig is not a hot take artist and is not usually one to rip a team or its ownership like this. As such, it should not be read as a columnist just looking to bash the Wilpons on a slow news day. To the contrary, this reads like something well-considered and a long time in the works. It has the added benefit of being 100% true and justified. The Mets have been run like a third rate operation for years. Even when the product on the field is good, fans have no confidence that ownership will do what it takes to maintain that success.

All that seems to matter to the Wilpons is the bottom line and everything flows from there. They may as well be making sewing machines or selling furniture.