Settling the Score: Sunday’s results — and a reminder of what Labor Day is all about

48 Comments

I decided to allow myself to sleep in a bit rather than do a full-blown ATH. It’s Labor Day, after all.

While we’re on the subject of Labor Day, allow me to remind everyone — as I have several times in the past, so forgive me if I repeat myself — that while Major League Baseball can see fit to honor Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, Earth Day and cancer awareness with special hats or some other on-the-field shoutout,it has never seen fit to give Labor Day similar due. No special caps. No moments of silence. Nothing particularly special to honor the folks who did nothing short of build this country from the ground up and continue to do the hard work that keeps us functioning as a society.

Sadly, this is a reflection of where we are now as a society. Organized labor makes up a smaller portion of the workforce than it ever has. Even a great many of the people who do the working in this country have bought in to the notion — propogated by those who profit from labor — that unions are tools of the communists. Most people believe that giving any lip service to the rights of workers is a suspect and even un-American pursuit.

But viewing labor — and, by extension, Labor Day — in such narrow terms is a mistake. Sure, there is an obvious political overtone to any conversation about labor. But people have died in the name of worker’s rights.  People continue to die on the job to bring you goods and services and to make our society function, and they always will.  Against that backdrop, to reduce Labor Day to an extra day off and to divorce it from its original purposes is just as much a mistake as doing so with Memorial Day or any other holiday which has at its heart a noble and reverent inspiration.

Red white and blue caps aren’t terribly important in the grand scheme of things. But I wish that Major League Baseball — a sport that, as we currently know and experience and understand it, is largely a product of organized labor itself — would mark the occasion. Maybe they will someday.

Enjoy your Labor Day, everyone.  But remember why we have a Labor Day to begin with.

And now, your scores:

Mariners 5, Nationals 3
Braves 1, Marlins 0
Angels 8, Athletics 1
Diamondbacks 6, Rockies 2
Astros 3, Rangers 2
Dodgers 7, Padres 1
White Sox 6, Tigers 2
Giants 15, Brewers 5
Red Sox 3, Rays 0
Cardinals 9, Cubs 6
Orioles 12, Twins 8
Reds 3, Pirates 2
Blue Jays 4, Yankees 3
Mets 6, Phillies 5
Indians vs. Royals — SUSPENDED DUE TO RAIN, with the Indians leading 4-2 heading into the bottom of 10th. Which has at least delayed yet another loss for Kansas City.

Hyun-Jin Ryu will open season in Dodgers’ rotation

Christian Petersen/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts announced on Monday that Hyun-Jin Ryu will open the regular season in the starting rotation, MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick reports.

Ryu, 30, missed the entire 2015 season and made only one start last season due to shoulder and elbow injuries. The lefty has looked solid in three spring appearances, however, yielding a lone run on five hits and a walk with eight strikeouts in nine innings.

With Scott Kazmir likely to begin the season on the disabled list, that leaves Alex Wood and Brandon McCarthy to battle it out for the fifth spot in the Dodgers’ rotation.

Jorge Soler diagnosed with strained oblique, Opening Day in doubt

Rob Tringali/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Royals outfielder Jorge Soler has been diagnosed with a strained oblique, making it likely that he begins the regular season on the disabled list, Rustin Dodd of The Kansas City Star reports.

The Royals acquired Soler from the Cubs in December in exchange for reliever Wade Davis. Over parts of three seasons with the Cubs, Soler hit .258/.328/.434 with 27 home runs and 98 RBI in 765 plate appearances.

When he’s healthy, Soler is expected to find himself in the Royals’ lineup as a right fielder and occasionally as a designated hitter.