Settling the Score: Sunday’s results — and a reminder of what Labor Day is all about

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I decided to allow myself to sleep in a bit rather than do a full-blown ATH. It’s Labor Day, after all.

While we’re on the subject of Labor Day, allow me to remind everyone — as I have several times in the past, so forgive me if I repeat myself — that while Major League Baseball can see fit to honor Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, Earth Day and cancer awareness with special hats or some other on-the-field shoutout,it has never seen fit to give Labor Day similar due. No special caps. No moments of silence. Nothing particularly special to honor the folks who did nothing short of build this country from the ground up and continue to do the hard work that keeps us functioning as a society.

Sadly, this is a reflection of where we are now as a society. Organized labor makes up a smaller portion of the workforce than it ever has. Even a great many of the people who do the working in this country have bought in to the notion — propogated by those who profit from labor — that unions are tools of the communists. Most people believe that giving any lip service to the rights of workers is a suspect and even un-American pursuit.

But viewing labor — and, by extension, Labor Day — in such narrow terms is a mistake. Sure, there is an obvious political overtone to any conversation about labor. But people have died in the name of worker’s rights.  People continue to die on the job to bring you goods and services and to make our society function, and they always will.  Against that backdrop, to reduce Labor Day to an extra day off and to divorce it from its original purposes is just as much a mistake as doing so with Memorial Day or any other holiday which has at its heart a noble and reverent inspiration.

Red white and blue caps aren’t terribly important in the grand scheme of things. But I wish that Major League Baseball — a sport that, as we currently know and experience and understand it, is largely a product of organized labor itself — would mark the occasion. Maybe they will someday.

Enjoy your Labor Day, everyone.  But remember why we have a Labor Day to begin with.

And now, your scores:

Mariners 5, Nationals 3
Braves 1, Marlins 0
Angels 8, Athletics 1
Diamondbacks 6, Rockies 2
Astros 3, Rangers 2
Dodgers 7, Padres 1
White Sox 6, Tigers 2
Giants 15, Brewers 5
Red Sox 3, Rays 0
Cardinals 9, Cubs 6
Orioles 12, Twins 8
Reds 3, Pirates 2
Blue Jays 4, Yankees 3
Mets 6, Phillies 5
Indians vs. Royals — SUSPENDED DUE TO RAIN, with the Indians leading 4-2 heading into the bottom of 10th. Which has at least delayed yet another loss for Kansas City.

Twins place Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with shin injury

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The Twins have placed third baseman Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with a stress reaction in his left shin, per the Star Tribune’s LaVelle E. Neal. Sano left Saturday’s game against the Diamondbacks after running out a ground ball double play in the fourth inning and was held out of Sunday’s lineup.

Sano, 24, is batting .267/.356/.514 with 28 home runs and 77 RBI in 475 plate appearances this season. The Twins are five back of the Indians for first place in the AL Central and currently hold a tie with the Angels for the second Wild Card slot.

Ehire Adrianza got the start at third base during Sunday’s win and could handle the hot corner while Sano is out. Eduardo Escobar could also get some time at third.

Buster Posey thinks Hector Neris hit him on purpose

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Giants catcher Buster Posey was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the eighth inning during Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Phillies. It was a first-pitch fastball from closer Hector Neris, who had just entered the game. The Giants then had the bases loaded, but Pablo Sandoval struck out to end the inning and the Giants went on to lose 5-2.

After the game, Posey said he thinks Neris hit him on purpose, per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. Posey thinks Neris thought he couldn’t get him out.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Neris said “absolutely not” when asked if he threw at Posey on purpose. The rest of the Phillies clubhouse, per Zolecki, “Say whaaat?!”

Here’s a link to the video of Posey getting hit. Now that we have automatic intentional walks, pitchers don’t even have to risk throwing four pitches wide of the strike zone to intentionally walk a hitter, so if Neris felt he couldn’t get Posey out, there was still no need to hit him. Furthermore, Neris isn’t going to hit Posey to load the bases and put the go-ahead run on first in a 4-2 ballgame. Sandoval has been a much worse hitter than Posey, for sure, but Neris would lose the platoon advantage if he felt like facing Sandoval instead, anyway.

Getting hit hurts, so it’s understandable Posey may have been salty in the moment. But after the game, when the pain has subsided and he’s had time to think over everything, there’s no way Posey should still come to the conclusion that Neris was trying to hit him on purpose.