Troy Tulowitzki says he’ll retire before he switches positions


Patrick Saunders of the Denver Post writes about Troy Tulowitzki and his plethora of injuries over the years. The sorts of injuries which, historically speaking, tend to cause players to have to move from more demanding defensive positions to less demanding ones. And shortstop is pretty darn demanding. Here’s what Tulo says about the possibility of having to change positions:

“No, I won’t move,” he said in a phone interview. “I will retire before I move.”

Not to third base? Not to first base, a position that could save him from wear and tear and possibly prolong his career?

“No. It’s just who I am, it’s what I do, it’s what I have dreamed of as a kid,” said Tulowitzki, 29. “It’s all I know and it’s all I’ve ever worked for. So I guess when you have a dream and you accomplish it and someone tries to take it away from you … it wouldn’t be worth it for me to try and move somewhere else.”

We all had dreams when we were kids. I was going to be a sports writer — wait, bad example.

Point is, if the time comes when the Rockies or whoever employs Tulowitzki decide that his highest and best use is as, say, a second or third baseman, such an attitude probably won’t play well. The only guy around who is allowed to play shortstop years after better options presented themselves for his team is Derek Jeter. And he had four World Series rings before that became an issue. More often than not, the Michael Young situation applies: you may want to play short, but it’s a team game and even the big stars move off short when better options are available.

Mariners claim Dario Alvarez off waivers from Cubs

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Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports that the Mariners have claimed pitcher Dario Alvarez off waivers from the Cubs. The Mariners will option him to Triple-A Tacoma and have him report to minor league camp. Alvarez will serve as bullpen depth for the Mariners.

Alvarez, 29, has  spent parts of four seasons in the majors with the Mets, Braves, and Rangers. He signed with the Cubs as a free agent in November. Across 48 innings of relief, the lefty owns a 5.06 ERA with 61 strikeouts and 22 walks. His spring with the Cubs wasn’t any better, as he yielded six runs on seven hits and six walks with 11 strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings.