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Madison Bumgarner gets everything but “Buster Hug” in dominant win


SAN FRANCISCO – It all said so much about Madison Bumgarner.

His fastball was pure backwoods camouflage, jumping like a rabbit, kicking like a buck and swooping like a red-tailed hawk.

His jaw and his brow were locked tight as bowstrings as he fired 24 first-pitch strikes to 28 batters, set traps with an astounding 15 0-2 counts and threw ball three just once all night.

He stepped on one twig, when Justin Morneau hit a two-strike curveball into the right field corner to start the eighth inning. But Bumgarner’s night wasn’t defined by the buildup to a perfect game, or by The One That Got Away.

It was what happened immediately after the Giants’ broad-shouldered, soft-eyed left-hander rubbed up a new baseball as Morneau stood on second base. After sellout crowd sighed and showered him with appreciation, and Bumgarner turned ornery.

The next three batters: 11 pitches, 11 strikes, six of them swinging, and three strikeouts.

Kill shot.

[RECAP: Bumgarner’s perfect game broken up in eighth]

“Really,” said Giants manager Bruce Bochy following Bumgarner’s one-hit, career-high tying 13-strikeout performance the 3-0 victory over the Colorado Rockies Tuesday night, “that game was probably more impressive than a lot of no-hitters.”

It was what the Giants needed after the previous night, when they were a poor reflection of a contending team in a disheveled loss to a depleted Rockies club that had dropped 23 of 26 road games since sweeping three here in mid-June.

Bumgarner had a 5.17 ERA at AT&T Park and nobody could understand it. Buster Posey was hitting .239 with an out-of-character .278 on-base percentage at AT&T Park and nobody could understand it. The Giants had lost their edge at home for more than two months and … well, maybe the shortcomings of their best all-around pitcher and hitter might explain some of it, right?

But this time, Bumgarner took charge and Posey provided all the offense with a pair of home runs. The two-run shot came in the sixth inning. The solo shot followed in the eighth.

It was a relief, Posey acknowledged, “because at that point you could sense he had an opportunity, the way he was throwing. It definitely would’ve been stressful if we didn’t have any runs on the board in the ninth.”

But a two-strike curveball to Morneau didn’t splash in the dirt, and his NL-best .317 average isn’t entirely a product of Coors Field. Certainly, perfect games have been lost on worse pitches.

“It was not a bad pitch, really,” Posey said. “Just a good piece of hitting.

“When he’s throwing the ball like that, it makes my job pretty easy. … The most impressive to me was the fact he gave up the hit and struck out the next three batters. That shows the kind of poise he has.”

Said Bochy: “The one thing you know you’ll get from Madison is great concentration. You may beat him but it’s not for a lack of effort or focus.”

Want to know something else about Bumgarner? When he batted in the seventh inning, just six outs away from perfection, he did not leave the bat on his shoulder. He took one of his lumberjack cuts and rocketed a lineout to deep right field.

Most pitchers would have stood there in the box, not wanting to disrupt any particles.

“Hmmmmmmm,” said Bumgarner. “I can’t really … no. I wouldn’t do that.”

Bumgarner took nothing for granted after Morneau’s double. Remember, the Giants’ free-fall began in June when they led the Rockies in the eighth inning or later three times, and lost all three games.

This time, it would not slip away. Bumgarner retired the final six batters to record his sixth career complete game and his second shutout. It also was his second one-hitter. This was the deepest he has taken any kind of no-hit or perfect-game bid in his career. You have to believe he’ll take one deeper still.

Does he pine for the day when the clubhouse serenades him, as they did for Tim Lincecum this year and last, and Matt Cain in 2012?

“I mean, it would be … it’d be great,” said Bumgarner, who threw 80 of 103 pitches for strikes. “It’d be cool to do. It’s a cool individual accomplishment. But that’s not important to me. It’s definitely amazing but when it comes down to it, we’re trying to win games. That’s it. It’s about your teammates and winning championships.”

Here is what he did accomplish, though:

–He reached double-digit strikeouts for the 19th time in his career, putting him behind only Lincecum, Jason Schmidt and Juan Marichal in Giants history. Even Gaylord Perry did it just 15 times. Bumgarner just turned 25 years old, by the way.

–His six games of 10-plus strikeouts and zero walks are the most in Giants franchise history.

–He is 15-9 and tied for the major league lead in victories. With seven starts remaining, he retains a shot at becoming the Giants’ first 20-game winner since Bill Swift and John Burkett in 1993.

–He became the first Giant to throw four complete games in a season since Cain in 2010. Maybe, one of these days soon, he’ll join the ranks of Cy Young Award winners, too.

Posey remains the face of the franchise, but can there be any doubt that Bumgarner is the thick legs and torso?

Without him, the Giants rotation would be nothing but cracks and fissures and age spots. Lincecum is banished to the bullpen for the first time in his career, Cain is hoping to bounce back from elbow surgery next spring, Tim Hudson will turn 40 next summer, 30-somethings Jake Peavy and Ryan Vogelsong are impending free agents and the minor league system is as well stocked with arms as a Opa-Locka convenience store with a tropical storm on its doorstep.

They have been through the storms this season, slid back to the pack in a flash-flood of losses. Bumgarner did not get the perfect game Tuesday night, or the no-hitter or the ice bucket or the cup of champagne.

But he did give the Giants a little backbone, and maybe that’s what some of them needed.

Even if the night didn’t end with a full-fledged Buster Hug.

“Aw,” said Posey, “I don’t know if I could’ve picked him up anyway.”

Cavaliers will move ring ceremony to avoid conflict with World Series start

CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 11: A general exterior image of the Quicken Loans arena which is next door to Progressive Field where the Chicago White Sox will take on the Cleveland Indians on July 11, 2014 in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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In a show of good sportsmanship, the Cleveland Cavaliers have moved their championship ring ceremony start time back to 7 PM EDT to avoid conflicting with the start of the World Series opener on Tuesday. The Indians are set to host Game 1 at Progressive Field on October 25, while the Cavs will open the 2016-17 NBA season against the New York Knicks at the nearby Quicken Loans Arena, preceded by a ceremony recognizing their first franchise title.

In the event that the Indians clinch a World Series title, it’ll be the first time Cleveland has seen two championships in the same calendar year since 1948, when the Indians’ last Series title came on the back of the Cleveland Browns’ All-American Football Conference championship against the Buffalo Bills. The same was true for the Dodgers in 1988, when their World Series win against the Athletics coincided with the Los Angeles Lakers’ 11th championship, while Chicago has yet to see a multi-title year among their NBA, NFL, and MLB franchises.

Regardless of the Series’ outcome, Cleveland fans will get the chance to revel in one long-awaited championship win on Tuesday before watching the beginning of a nail-biting conclusion to another long-awaited playoff run. The Cavaliers are scheduled for 7 PM EDT on October 25, while the Indians will take the field at 8 PM EDT.

Indians could benefit from long rest before the World Series

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - SEPTEMBER 09: Danny Salazar #31 of the Cleveland Indians delivers a pitch against the Minnesota Twins during the first inning of the game on September 9, 2016 at Target Field in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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If any team can turn a six-day rest period into an advantage, it’s the Indians. The club polished off their pennant race with another injured starter and an overtaxed bullpen, as Trevor Bauer exited in Game 3 of the ALCS with a laceration on his right pinky finger, leaving the bullpen to shoulder 16 innings through the last three games of the series. On Friday,’s Jordan Bastian reported that injured starter Danny Salazar could rejoin the rotation in the World Series, though he’ll need at least one more simulated game before Terry Francona determines whether or not he’s fit to return for the team’s last postseason push.

Bauer, who has been under the close watch of hand specialist Dr. Thomas Graham, told the press that he feels confident that he’ll be ready for a World Series start when the final showdown commences on Tuesday. Keeping the wound bandaged is not an option during games, and Bauer said that Dr. Graham decided against additional stitches to keep the laceration from re-opening. Instead, they’re banking on extra days of rest to heal the cut naturally. Should Francona pencil the right-hander into the lineup for Game 3 or 4, he’ll have had 10-11 days to rest his finger between starts — just a hair under the seven games Bauer said he was prepared to pitch.

Salazar, too, has been preparing for a World Series showdown. He’s scheduled to pitch three innings of a simulated game this weekend, and if it goes well, it could land him a spot in the starting rotation alongside Bauer, Corey Kluber, Josh Tomlin, and newcomer Ryan Merritt. Salazar has been sidelined since September 9 with a right forearm strain, and even after undergoing a rigorous throwing program over the last several weeks, any kind of comeback is expected to be curbed by a strict innings limit. Francona has been understandably tight-lipped about his World Series roster, but he hasn’t yet nixed the idea of utilizing Salazar out of the rotation, provided the right-hander remains healthy for another week or so.

The Indians have had to remain flexible throughout their seven-game playoff run after weathering injuries to Corey Kluber and Trevor Bauer, pushing their rotation through several games on short rest and relying heavily on Andrew Miller and Cody Allen‘s one-two punch in the ‘pen to clinch more than a few postseason victories. While history doesn’t always favor the first team to secure their league’s pennant race, an extra week of rest should only benefit Cleveland’s beleaguered pitching staff.