Madison Bumgarner Getty

Madison Bumgarner gets everything but “Buster Hug” in dominant win

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SAN FRANCISCO – It all said so much about Madison Bumgarner.

His fastball was pure backwoods camouflage, jumping like a rabbit, kicking like a buck and swooping like a red-tailed hawk.

His jaw and his brow were locked tight as bowstrings as he fired 24 first-pitch strikes to 28 batters, set traps with an astounding 15 0-2 counts and threw ball three just once all night.

He stepped on one twig, when Justin Morneau hit a two-strike curveball into the right field corner to start the eighth inning. But Bumgarner’s night wasn’t defined by the buildup to a perfect game, or by The One That Got Away.

It was what happened immediately after the Giants’ broad-shouldered, soft-eyed left-hander rubbed up a new baseball as Morneau stood on second base. After sellout crowd sighed and showered him with appreciation, and Bumgarner turned ornery.

The next three batters: 11 pitches, 11 strikes, six of them swinging, and three strikeouts.

Kill shot.

[RECAP: Bumgarner’s perfect game broken up in eighth]

“Really,” said Giants manager Bruce Bochy following Bumgarner’s one-hit, career-high tying 13-strikeout performance the 3-0 victory over the Colorado Rockies Tuesday night, “that game was probably more impressive than a lot of no-hitters.”

It was what the Giants needed after the previous night, when they were a poor reflection of a contending team in a disheveled loss to a depleted Rockies club that had dropped 23 of 26 road games since sweeping three here in mid-June.

Bumgarner had a 5.17 ERA at AT&T Park and nobody could understand it. Buster Posey was hitting .239 with an out-of-character .278 on-base percentage at AT&T Park and nobody could understand it. The Giants had lost their edge at home for more than two months and … well, maybe the shortcomings of their best all-around pitcher and hitter might explain some of it, right?

But this time, Bumgarner took charge and Posey provided all the offense with a pair of home runs. The two-run shot came in the sixth inning. The solo shot followed in the eighth.

It was a relief, Posey acknowledged, “because at that point you could sense he had an opportunity, the way he was throwing. It definitely would’ve been stressful if we didn’t have any runs on the board in the ninth.”

But a two-strike curveball to Morneau didn’t splash in the dirt, and his NL-best .317 average isn’t entirely a product of Coors Field. Certainly, perfect games have been lost on worse pitches.

“It was not a bad pitch, really,” Posey said. “Just a good piece of hitting.

“When he’s throwing the ball like that, it makes my job pretty easy. … The most impressive to me was the fact he gave up the hit and struck out the next three batters. That shows the kind of poise he has.”

Said Bochy: “The one thing you know you’ll get from Madison is great concentration. You may beat him but it’s not for a lack of effort or focus.”

Want to know something else about Bumgarner? When he batted in the seventh inning, just six outs away from perfection, he did not leave the bat on his shoulder. He took one of his lumberjack cuts and rocketed a lineout to deep right field.

Most pitchers would have stood there in the box, not wanting to disrupt any particles.

“Hmmmmmmm,” said Bumgarner. “I can’t really … no. I wouldn’t do that.”

Bumgarner took nothing for granted after Morneau’s double. Remember, the Giants’ free-fall began in June when they led the Rockies in the eighth inning or later three times, and lost all three games.

This time, it would not slip away. Bumgarner retired the final six batters to record his sixth career complete game and his second shutout. It also was his second one-hitter. This was the deepest he has taken any kind of no-hit or perfect-game bid in his career. You have to believe he’ll take one deeper still.

Does he pine for the day when the clubhouse serenades him, as they did for Tim Lincecum this year and last, and Matt Cain in 2012?

“I mean, it would be … it’d be great,” said Bumgarner, who threw 80 of 103 pitches for strikes. “It’d be cool to do. It’s a cool individual accomplishment. But that’s not important to me. It’s definitely amazing but when it comes down to it, we’re trying to win games. That’s it. It’s about your teammates and winning championships.”

Here is what he did accomplish, though:

–He reached double-digit strikeouts for the 19th time in his career, putting him behind only Lincecum, Jason Schmidt and Juan Marichal in Giants history. Even Gaylord Perry did it just 15 times. Bumgarner just turned 25 years old, by the way.

–His six games of 10-plus strikeouts and zero walks are the most in Giants franchise history.

–He is 15-9 and tied for the major league lead in victories. With seven starts remaining, he retains a shot at becoming the Giants’ first 20-game winner since Bill Swift and John Burkett in 1993.

–He became the first Giant to throw four complete games in a season since Cain in 2010. Maybe, one of these days soon, he’ll join the ranks of Cy Young Award winners, too.

Posey remains the face of the franchise, but can there be any doubt that Bumgarner is the thick legs and torso?

Without him, the Giants rotation would be nothing but cracks and fissures and age spots. Lincecum is banished to the bullpen for the first time in his career, Cain is hoping to bounce back from elbow surgery next spring, Tim Hudson will turn 40 next summer, 30-somethings Jake Peavy and Ryan Vogelsong are impending free agents and the minor league system is as well stocked with arms as a Opa-Locka convenience store with a tropical storm on its doorstep.

They have been through the storms this season, slid back to the pack in a flash-flood of losses. Bumgarner did not get the perfect game Tuesday night, or the no-hitter or the ice bucket or the cup of champagne.

But he did give the Giants a little backbone, and maybe that’s what some of them needed.

Even if the night didn’t end with a full-fledged Buster Hug.

“Aw,” said Posey, “I don’t know if I could’ve picked him up anyway.”

The Yankees release former prospect Slade Heathcott

TAMPA, FL - FEBRUARY 27:  Slade Heathcott #71 of the New York Yankees poses for a portrait on February 27, 2016 at George M Steinbrenner Stadium  in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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The Yankees announced last night that they have given an unconditional release to outfielder Slade Heathcott. They needed room on the 40-man roster and he was seen as expendable. There is no indication that they’re going to try to re-sign him or anything. He’s just gone.

Heathcott was the 29th overall pick in the 2009 draft and at one time was considered the second best prospect in the Yankees’ system. Injuries and decreased production as he climbed the minor league ladder took the shine off this particular apple, however. He had a nice little cup of coffee with New York last season, but he’s hitting a mere .230/.271/.310 at Triple-A this year in his second go-around.

Heathcott can play center field and has good tools, but he’s going to have to use them working for another organization.

Pete Rose says no one ever told him not to gamble on baseball anymore

Former Cincinnati Reds player and manager Pete Rose poses while taping a segment for Miami Television News on the campus of Miami University, Monday, Sept. 21, 2015, in Oxford, Ohio. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)
Associated Press
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Pete Rose will soon be inducted into the Reds Hall of Fame and have his number retired and all of that jazz. To mark the occasion, Cincinnati Magazine interviewed the Hit King. And, for, like, the 4.256th straight time, Rose shows that he’s in complete denial about why he was banned in 1989 and why he was not reinstated last year when Rob Manfred agreed to review his case:

In this time of limbo after the ban, did you worry about your legacy? I normally don’t ever worry about anything that I’m not in control of. I wasn’t in control of anything in that situation. I went through a period when I got suspended where I didn’t even go to the ballpark. It’s not because I didn’t want to. There were so many restrictions on me, I just didn’t want to put people through that. It didn’t feel good to me.

Sure he wasn’t in control of anything. He was a tiny boat, cast out onto the waves, left to drift in a sea of uncertainty and powerlessness.

But it gets better. Rose was asked about how he changed his life after his ban:

But you still bet on baseball, albeit legally. It seems like the commissioner’s office has taken issue with that fact. Have you considered not betting on baseball anymore? That’s a good point. You remember reading about Bart Giamatti telling me to reconfigure my life? OK, no one has ever told me—including Manfred, including Selig—what does that mean? I guess my point is, just tell me what you want me to do and I’ll do it. I’m in control. Just tell me. If I want to bet on Monday Night Football, and that’s the way I enjoy my life, why is everybody so worried about that? I’m 75 years old, I have to be able to have some form of entertainment. I’m not betting out of my means. It’s not illegal. If you don’t want me to bet on baseball or anything else, just tell me.

If they told you that— I’d do it. Absolutely. But no one has ever explained “reconfigure your life.” I have taken responsibility for it. I have apologized for it. I have shown I’m sorry. But there again, no matter how many times you say you’re sorry, not everybody’s going to hear you. All I can do is imagine what they meant when they said reconfigure my life. And evidently, no one’s willing to tell me what that means.

So it was all a big misunderstanding. A man who was in his late 40s was banned for gambling on baseball and was told to straighten up yet he had no idea, for 26 years, that maybe it’d be a good idea for him to not gamble on baseball anymore in order to get back into the good graces of the folks who banned him. Damn, why did they pose such impossible riddles to him! If only he had a clue as to what sort of behavior would have improved his chances!

But really, guys: Rose is ready to stop betting on baseball. All you have to do is tell him. If he had known before now, well, we’d be having a TOTALLY different conversation, I’m sure.

Jose Fernandez plunked the Rays mascot

Raymond
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Nuke: “What are you doin’ out here? I’m cruisin’, man.”

Crash: “I want you to throw the next one at the mascot.”

Nuke: “Why? I’m finally throwin’ it where I wanna throw it.”

Crash: “Just throw it at the bull. Trust me.”

The Tampa Bay Rays’ mascot is not a bull — it’s this weird blue thing named Raymond — but apparently Crash Davis got to Marlins starter Jose Fernandez before yesterday’s Marlins-Rays game. Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports that Fernandez, a Tampa native, plunked the Rays’ mascot, Raymond, while warming up in the bullpen before the game. Why?

“He was all over my business,” Fernandez said. “I’m trying to concentrate. It was a little change-up that came out of my hand. Just part of the game, man. This is a game, and I love to have fun.”

Raymond needs to learn to play the game the right way if he doesn’t want no-nonsense old schoolers like Fernandez putting him in his place. Reminds of how Bob Gibson and Don Drysdale used to bury one in Mr. Met’s ear on the regular. Guys like them don’t take no guff.

And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

MIAMI, FL - MAY 21: Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins pitches during the first inning of the game against the Washington Nationals at Marlins Park on May 21, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Marlins 9, Rays 1: Jose Fernandez struck out 12 in seven innings. After the game he said “it’s time for me to learn how to manage myself on the mound and learn how to pitch.” Wow, he’s doing all of this in ignorance? Just imagine how many dudes he’d strike out if he learned to pitch. It’s like Barry Allen in season 1 of “The Flash” when he still didn’t even know what he was doing but was still pretty impressive. I mean, look at Fernandez in the picture above. He even sorta looks like The Flash.

Astros 4, Orioles 2: George Springer hit two solo homers, but the real story was, once again, just how strikeout-tastic the Astros pitching staff was. Astros pitchers combined for 15 strikeouts on the night. That goes with their 18 strikeouts on Wednesday night and their 19 strikeouts on Tuesday to set a new major league record for strikeouts in a three-game series with 52. The New 52, as it were.

Pirates 8, Diamondbacks 3: Gerrit Cole hit a three-run homer but the Pirates blew the lead he gave them. Luckily Josh Harrison, who didn’t start because he was sick, came off the bench to hit  two-run double in the bottom of the sixth to give them back the lead for good. They’d add some insurance later. Always gotta be careful not to add too much insurance, though, as it may inspire Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray to bump you off. Or maybe Kathleen Turner and William Hurt.

Blue Jays 3, Yankees 1: J.A. Happ allowed one run over seven innings and notched his sixth win. He outdueled CC Sabathia who turned in his best outing of the season (7 IP, 2 H, 2 R, 0 ER, 7K) but simply didn’t get the run support. Sabathia allowed one earned run in 20 innings in the month of May.

Nationals 2, Cardinals 1: Homers from Bryce Harper and Danny Espinosa backed Joe Ross, who is quite quietly having a sweet season at the back end of the Nats’ rotation, boasting a 2.52 ERA in nine starts. OK, he’s probably not boasting. He seems like a fine young man who lets his actions speak rather than his words. That’s what my source tell me, anyway. My source is Joe Ross’ mom. I’m worried that she may be biased, however, so I’m using a second source: his grandma. I’m gonna get to the bottom of this Joe Ross character controversy, that I can promise you.

Rockies 8, Red Sox 2: Jackie Bradley Jr.’s hitting streak ends at 29. And with that, Joe DiMaggio cracks open the bottle of champagne he saves for the end of every hitting streak of 25 games or more. Mercury Morris taught him that trick and you can never go wrong with doing something Mercury Morris thinks is cool. Trevor Story hit his 13th homer.Carlos Gonzalez and Dustin Garneau went deep too. Clay Buchholz‘s ERA is now 6.35.

Brewers 6, Braves 2Ryan Braun and Jonathan Villar each homered as the Brewers swept the Braves. They have three wins in Turner Field in three games this year. Atlanta has two wins in Turner Field in 22 games this year.

White Sox vs. Royals — POSTPONED: I don’t care if it rains

(Let’s all go to the bar)
I don’t care if there’s a hurricane
(Let’s all go to the bar)
And I don’t care if I’m the one to blame
(Let’s all go to the bar)