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And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


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Royals 2, Twins 1: Alex Gordon with the walkoff two-run homer. This one, apparently, was called by the bat boy. Here’s Yost’s telling of it:

“The bat boy who never says anything turns around and says, `Esky is going to get a hit and Gordo’s taking him in the fountain,” Yost said. “I said, `OK. Sounds like a pretty good plan.”

“Esky” for Escobar? It’s sad that the convention of lazy baseball nicknames is reaching yet another generation.

Giants 3, Rockies 0: MadBum — which is another lazy nicknaming convention but not as lazy as simply adding a “y” to the first syllable — was perfect into the eighth and finished with a one-hit shutout in which he struck out 13 dudes. He needed only 103 pitches to do it which, given the strikeout total, is really damn impressive. One hanging breaking ball that Justin Morneau hit for a double was all that stood between Bumgarner and perfection.

Angels 8, Marlins 2: The Angels are back alone atop the AL West and all of baseball thanks to yet another nice start from Matt Shoemaker, who allowed only two hits over seven shutout innings. Mike Trout and Albert Pujols both went 3 for 4.

Astros 4, Athletics 2: Chris Carter helped put the Angels in first too, and knocked the A’s out of this one, with a three-run homer in the eighth. Carter has homered in four of his past five games against his old team. He has 32 on the year.

Orioles 4, Rays 2: I’ve been complaining a lot about the pace of play lately, but here the guys in the game were too, following a 4-2, nine-inning game which lasted three hours and thirty-seven minutes. Here’s Buck Showalter:

“It was a mentally challenging game because it’s such a grind. A lot of time, a lot of deep counts, a lot of catcher visits.”

Here’s catcher Caleb Joseph:

“Coming off last night, we had such a great game and you want to kind of repeat it, but the pace of the game kind of slows your excitement down a little bit. You’ve got to stay into it, and our guys did a great job.”

If the manager of the winning team and the guy who drove in two for the winning team are talking about the pace of the game being a barrier to enjoying it, how are fans supposed to feel?

Padres 4, Brewers 1: Tyson Ross pitched well, but he also doubled and scored in the third and walked in the fifth. He’s now 4 for 10 with two walks in the month of August. Viva La National League.

Mariners 5, Rangers 0: Endy Chavez hit a two-run double, Robinson Cano socked a homer and James Paxton tossed six and two-thirds shutout innings. The Rangers didn’t get a runner past first base until the ninth inning.

Dodgers 9, Diamondbacks 5: The Dodgers hung six on the Dbacks in the fourth inning, thanks in part to two calls — a play at the plate and a bunt single to first base — which were overturned on replay, allowing the rally to continue. Not that there was anything particularly controversial about it. It was really more about Trevor Cahill getting knocked around like crazy which was the problem.

Mets 3, Braves 2: Juan Lagares hit a two-run homer and had seven putouts in center field, one of which was a diving catch in the gap, robbing Alex Wood of a hit. Lagares is incredible out there.

Indians 8, White Sox 6: In the tenth, with a runner on second, Zach Walters was asked to bunt. He couldn’t get the bunt down, so he ended up swinging away. Which was pretty darn lucky considering he hit a two-run homer that ended up winning the game. Cleveland continues to hang around, 4.5 back in the wild card.

Cubs 3, Reds 0: Travis Wood had been in a horrible funk, but he snapped out of it against his former team, allowing two hits over six shutout innings. Big day for “against his former team” yesterday.

Tigers 5, Yankees 2: The Yankees winning streak ends at five. Rick Porcello picked up his fifteenth win of the season after eight solid frames. Jacoby Ellsbury had two homers in a winning effort in a losing cause.

Pirates 5, Cardinals 2: Ike Davis hit a a tiebreaking three-run homer in the eighth. Josh Harrison added a homer. Bad news, though: Andrew McCutchen left early after aggravating that rib injury that sent him to the DL earlier this month. It’s unclear if he’ll be out today.

Red Sox 11, Blue Jays 7: Just your standard seven-run 11th inning. Part of it was a Mike Napoli three-run homer which went approximately fifty gabillion miles. Allen Craig hit a two-run shot in the same inning. Dustin Pedroia drove in four on the night. Fifteen pitchers appeared in this four hour, thirty-three minute affair.

Phillies 4, Nationals 3: The Phillies have won five of six. And yet another Phillies player was mad at Ryne Sandberg for how he was used in the game. Cole Hamels this time, who ended up with the no-decision after being yanked in the eighth. Sandberg’s hook was a bit quick — Hamels had only thrown 84 pitches — but it’s notable that this stuff is happening even with the Phillies winning a lot lately.

Major League Baseball will investigate Yasiel Puig for his role in Miami nightclub brawl

Yasiel Puig
AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi

It was reported on Friday afternoon that Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig was involved in a brawl at a Miami nightclub. Details were scant at the time, but he reportedly left with a bruise on his face.

Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times reports that Major League Baseball plans to investigate Puig under the league’s new domestic violence policy for his role in the brawl. Citing a report from TMZ, Hernandez notes that Puig shoved his sister, “brutally sucker-punched” the manager of the bar, and instigated the brawl.

The Dodgers and Puig’s agent have thus far refused to comment on the situation.

Rockies shortstop Jose Reyes was the first player to be investigated under the league’s new domestic violence policy earlier this month, as he allegedly assaulted his wife. Reyes has pleaded not guilty after he was charged with domestic abuse in Hawaii.

As our own Craig Calcaterra pointed out, commissioner Rob Manfred does not need to wait for Puig to plead guilty or to be found guilty to levy a punishment.

Dayan Viciedo close to signing with Japan’s Chunichi Dragons

Dayan Viciedo
AP Photo/Carlos Osorio
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Patrick Newman is reporting that the Chunichi Dragons of Japan’s Nippon Professional Baseball and outfielder Dayan Viciedo are close to an agreement on a contract. Newman notes that the Dragons are close to signing pitcher Jordan Norberto as well.

Viciedo, 26, has struggled since making his major league debut in 2010 with the White Sox, batting an aggregate .254/.298/.424 with 66 home runs and 211 RBI in 1,798 plate appearances. He spent the 2015 season with Triple-A Charlotte (White Sox) and Nashville (Athletics), hitting a composite .287/.348/.450. While Viciedo can hit the occasional home run, he hasn’t shown the ability to do much else at the big league level. Given his age, he could prove himself in Japan and parlay that into a renewed shot in the majors in the future.

The White Sox signed Viciedo out of Cuba in December 2008, agreeing to a four-year, $10 million deal. The club re-signed him to one-year deals in 2013 and ’14 for $2.8 million each and $4.4 million ahead of the 2015 season.

Blue Jays sign J.A. Happ to a three-year, $36 million contract

J.A. Happ
AP Photo/David Zalubowski

Update (8:45 PM EST): Per Sportsnet’s Shi Davidi, Happ will get $10 million in 2016 and $13 million each in 2017 and ’18.

*’s Gregor Chisholm reports that the Blue Jays have signed lefty J.A. Happ to a three-year deal worth $36 million.

Happ, 33, had a rebirth as a member of the Pirates last season after starting the season with 20 subpar starts with the Mariners. He made 11 starts for the Buccos, boasting a 1.85 ERA with a 69/13 K/BB ratio over 63 1/3 innings.

Travis Sawchik of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported this past August that Happ’s newfound success had to do with a delivery tweak suggested by Pirates pitching coach Ray Searage. The Blue Jays are certainly hoping that adjustment is the full explanation for his success.

The Jays’ signing of Happ most likely signifies they won’t be pursuing free agent lefty David Price.

This will be Happ’s second stint with the Blue Jays. The Astros dealt him to Toronto in a July 2012 trade. He posted a 4.39 ERA with a 256/113 K/BB ratio in 291 innings with the Jays, then went to the Mariners in a trade this past December that brought outfielder Michael Saunders to the Jays.

Orioles “searching everywhere” for outfield help

L.J. Hoes
AP Photo

CSN Mid-Atlantic’s Rich Dubroff reports that the Orioles are “searching everywhere” for outfield help. The club recently acquired L.J. Hoes from the Astros in exchange for cash considerations, throwing him into a stable of six outfielders that could potentially crack the Opening Day Roster.

Adam Jones, of course, will open the season in center field. But in the corner outfield and on the bench, Dubroff lists Hoes along with Dariel Alvarez, Junior Lake, David Lough, Nolan Reimold and Henry Urrutia. Both Lough and Reimold are eligible for arbitration — Lough for the first time, and Reimold for his third and final year — so it remains to be seen if the Orioles will retain both of them.

The Orioles could target outfield help in the Rule-5 draft, and they could also target outfielders in free agency. Gerardo Parra, acquired by the O’s in a trade with the Brewers at the trade deadline, remains a possibility but the team is reluctant to offer him more than two years.