New York Mets v Miami Marlins

David Wright is out of the Mets’ lineup and admits his shoulder is “not 100 percent”

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Recently there have been conflicting reports about the status of David Wright’s injured shoulder, but the Mets third baseman is out of the lineup tonight for the second straight game and admitted that he’s still hurting.

Wright is actually sitting out due to neck spasms, but told Adam Rubin of ESPN New York that the shoulder is a bigger problem and is still “not 100 percent.”

He’s gone 143 at-bats without a homer, including hitting .215 since the All-Star break, yet Wright continues to insist that even at “not 100 percent” his shoulder isn’t the reason for his career-worst season:

Is the shoulder 100 percent? No. But that takes rest. And that’s what the offseason is for. But is that the reason that I’m struggling the way I’m struggling? No. So I think it’s not a reasonable assessment as to why I’m playing poorly. The assessment as to why I’m playing poorly is that I’m not producing the way I’m capable of producing. I don’t think it’s because of my shoulder.

“I’m not producing because I’m not producing” doesn’t really address the issue, although I suppose Wright deserves some level of credit for not making excuses. Of course, if continuing to play through the shoulder problem is leading to horrible production it isn’t really helping Wright or the Mets anyway.

Mets hitting coach Lamar Johnson thinks the shoulder has been an issue and presumably he’s talked to Wright about it, so public quotes to the contrary or not it’s hard not to conclude the shoulder is to blame.

Braves sign former football player Sanders Commings

GLENDALE, AZ - AUGUST 15:  Cornerback Sanders Commings #26 of the Kansas City Chiefs on the sidelines during the pre-season NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on August 15, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
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The Braves have signed former football player and current outfielder Sanders Commings, an Augusta, Georgia native, to a minor league contract, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports.

Commings, 26, was a defensive back who played for the University of Georgia before being selected by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2013 draft. He appeared in two games in the 2013 season.

Commings also played baseball for Westside High School and was selected by the Diamondbacks in the 37th round of the 2008 draft. He chose to attend the University of Georgia instead. When football didn’t pan out, Commings started training with Jerry Hairston, Jr. Hairston said he was “blown away” when he saw Commings hit for the first time.

Obviously, Commings’ path to success as a professional baseball player will be long, but it’s a no-risk flier for the Braves. The club has past experience with football players, including Deion Sanders and Brian Jordan.

The next task for the Braves will be to acquire Ryan Goins from the Blue Jays. That way, players will look at the lineup card each day to see if it’s Commings or Goins.

Justin Verlander: “I’d like to see the AL and NL have the same rules… I vote NL rules.”

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 10:  Starting pitcher Justin Verlander #35 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Safeco Field on August 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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On Thursday afternoon, Rays pitcher Chris Archer asked his Twitter followers, “Lots swirling around what needs to be changed about the game of baseball. What do y’all want to see changed, if anything, & why?”

Tigers ace Justin Verlander responded:

To that, Archer said:

For what it’s worth, Verlander hasn’t been much of a hitter. In 47 career plate appearances, he has three singles and no extra-base hits. And if the AL did get rid of the DH rule, the Tigers would have nowhere to put Victor Martinez. Verlander, though, would have an easier time pitching to opposing pitchers rather than their DH’s.