Bryce Harper uses a lot of different guys’ bats. Here’s why.

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There was a dustup late last week — maybe less, than a dustup, but that’s the most minor word I can think of to describe “a thing people on those ESPN shout shows felt was worth talking about” — regarding Bryce Harper using one of Yasiel Puig’s bats in a game. I was in a pizza place Friday night where there was a TV tuned to one of those shoes and, on a split screen featuring two reporters who like to yell about things, were the words “Harper Used Puig’s Bat.” So I suppose that’s a controversy of some kind.

Not much of one, though. As Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post reports, Harper uses bats from lots of other players. Or at least their models, on a more or less constant try-out basis. If he likes one, he orders them with his name on them. There’s a whole family tree of bat usage, actually. Manny Ramirez had a model he liked named after him, which Ian Desmond adopted and now Harper is trying that one too. Eventually he’ll find one he likes for a while and it will be a Harper.

So it’s just a really inside baseball tech story, not a statement or an instance of guys who are supposed to be competing against one another being too friendly for the tastes of some people or whatever. An inside baseball tech story that would probably be pretty fascinating to known more about, actually. Someone with an attention span: please give us the definitive history of bat models, please. Along with one of those illustrated family trees. I’d buy a print of that.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.