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The Cubs grounds crew was short staffed because the Cubs were trying to avoid Obamacare

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This story keeps on giving.

Yesterday when the Cubs defended their grounds crew’s efforts during Tuesday night’s debacle against the Giants, the team noted that they had sent home many of the grounds crew workers earlier in the day. They made it sound as if it were standard operating procedure to do so. But the Chicago Sun-Times reports that there was a bit more to the team’s staffing decisions:

The staffing issues that hamstrung the grounds crew Tuesday during a mad dash with the tarp under a sudden rainstorm were created in part by a wide-ranging reorganization last winter of game-day personnel, job descriptions and work limits designed to keep the seasonal workers – including much of the grounds crew – under 130 hours per month, according to numerous sources with direct knowledge.

That’s the full-time worker definition under “Obamacare,” which requires employer-provided healthcare benefits for “big businesses” such as a major league team.

The Sun-Times article quotes anonymous officials from other teams which characterize the Cubs’ move in this regard as “cheap” and short-sighted.

Take this for what it’s worth, but the Cubs were deemed baseball’s most profitable team in 2013 and its owners are well-known partisan Republicans with a decidedly anti-Obama tilt. If there’s a team which is going to go out of its way to avoid having to pay Obamacare benefits, it’s not shocking that the Cubs are that team. Whether you think that’s a good thing or a bad thing likely depends on your political persuasion, of course.

Whether other teams have done this is unknown. Whether even twice as many grounds crew members could’ve fixed the problem in time on Tuesday is also unknown, as once a tarp is laden with water, it’s impossible for almost any number of people to move it. The head count — as opposed to the manner in which the tarp was rolled and unrolled — may have been irrelevant.

Of course, I am curious what those readers who have been on my case for pointing out that mistakes were made on Tuesday — readers who accused me of picking on poor blue collar workers in all of this — feel about a team cutting hours in order to not have to pay worker benefits.

New Jersey woman files suit against the Brewers after being struck by a batting practice foul ball

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - APRIL 11: New protective netting now protects lower deck fans from dugout to dugout at Citizens Bank Park before an opening day game between the San Diego Padres and Philadelphia Phillies on April 11, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
Rich Schultz/Getty Images
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A woman from Camden County in New Jersey has filed suit against the Milwaukee Brewers after being struck by a foul ball during batting practice two years ago at Miller Park, Jeff Goldman of NJ.com reports. According to her lawsuit, she suffered an orbital fracture to her left eye socket, nerve and iris damage, and a concussion.

The woman, Dana Morelli, was in the second row behind third base along with her fiancee and his son when she was struck by the foul ball. She had to remain in a dark room in Milwaukee before being able to safely travel home. (Sensitivity to light is a common symptom of a concussion.)

Fan safety has become a hot button topic recently. This past December, Major League Baseball issued safety recommendations but ultimately left it up to each ballpark to decide by how much to extend the netting.

Earlier this month, Phillies infielder Freddy Galvis fouled off a pitch that struck a fan. After the game, he clamored for the Phillies to increase protective netting at Citizens Bank Park to extend to the seats behind the dugout, where the fan was hit. Another fan was hit the next day and Galvis threw up his hands in frustration. While fans and owners seem to mostly be against netting, the players seem to be for it.

Mike Leake placed on the disabled list with shingles

Mike Leake
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The Cardinals have placed starter Mike Leake on the 15-day disabled list, retroactive to August 22, with shingles. Which: ugh. Anyone I’ve ever known who has had it wouldn’t wish it on their worst enemy.

Leake was diagnosed with the virus last week and had to be scratched from his scheduled start Saturday versus the Athletics. There is no timetable for Leake’s return. Leake is 9-9 with a 4.56 ERA in 25 starts for the Cardinals. Poor dude.