Yoenis Cespedes to the Oakland A’s: “I hope you win it all”

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Jane Lee of MLB.com caught up with former Oakland Athletic Yoenis Cespedes. She got his feelings on the day of the trade that sent him to Boston and how he’s coping since. Cespedes said he almost cried when he found out he was leaving Oakland — his mother did cry — and that he hoped to stay with the A’s for his entire career. Still, he gets that it’s a business and holds no hard feelings.

Quite the opposite, actually. He asked Lee to give a message to his former teammates in Oakland:

“It was a true and sincere honor to have started my career with the Oakland A’s, and I wish the players, the coaching staff, the front office, nothing but the best of luck moving forward and in the postseason, and I hope you win it all. I want you to know it was a great pleasure to play there, and I just want to say thank you to everybody over there.”

That’s a pretty generous and level-headed take there. Of course, should Boston be back in the playoff hunt in 2015, I presume he’ll be far less enthusiastic about wanting to see the Athletics do well.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.