Masahiro Tanaka throws first bullpen session since being shut down with elbow injury

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Yankees right-hander Masahiro Tanaka got back on the mound today for the first time since he was shut down in early July with a partial tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his throwing elbow. While he still has a long way to go before returning to game action, he came out of it just fine.

According to the Associated Press, Tanaka threw a total of 25 pitches. It was all fastballs and he wasn’t throwing at full intensity, but he told Chad Jennings of the Journal News that he was happy with how things went today.

“I think we’re heading in the right direction,” Tanaka said. “So I feel really good about it.”

Tanaka said he wasn’t throwing at 100 percent effort, but he also said this felt like a better session than his first bullpen of spring training.

“I felt that I was able to throw the way that wanted to,” he said. “… I was able to get through it without any pain.”

It’s unclear when Tanaka will throw again, as the Yankees will likely see how he feels tomorrow before deciding on the next step, but he’s hoping to incorporate some offspeed pitches in his next session. The track record for pitchers rehabbing a UCL tear is not very promising, but Tanaka would likely miss all or most of next season anyway if he had Tommy John surgery tomorrow, so the Yankees will continue to take a shot in the dark and cross their fingers.

Tanaka, 25, was 12-4 with a 2.51 ERA and 135/19 K/BB ratio over 129 1/3 innings in his first season stateside prior to the injury.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: