Here’s today’s dose of barfy Derek Jeter sentiment

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Kevin Kernan of the New York Post gives us one of your more barf-inducing pieces of Jeter-worship in a year that has already seen many (and which will see many, many more over the next month and a half):

It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter.

The way the Yankees are playing, there will be no October in Jeter’s final season . . . At the age of 40, Jeter was supposed to go out the right way, playing October baseball and letting the chips fall where they may . . .It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter . . . It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter.

Those last two refrains of “It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter” are what sends this over the top. Three total, which turn a column about Jeter’s October exploits into a fanboy bit of hand-wringing. Or is it wishing? Or maybe praying? To be honest I have no idea what this is all about. I’m not sure if Kernan — who normally does not tend to skew sentimental — is merely trying to serve the Yankee homers who do or if he’s actually letting his guard down and is getting genuinely verklempt.

Either way, he would have done well to explain to us why Jeter is so damn special that he deserves to go to the playoffs when so many other greats did not get to end their careers on high notes. Indeed, you can probably count the ones who did on one hand. Babe Ruth quit in May while playing for a team that lost 115 games. Mickey Mantle’s last year saw the Yankees finish in 5th place. Yogi Berra ended his playing days with a 112-loss Mets team. Ted Williams finished with a great personal season, but on a team that lost 89 games.

That’s usually how it goes in baseball. Why Derek Jeter should be an exception is beyond me. That people argue with a straight face that he somehow deserves to be is what aggravates the holy hell out of people about folks in the media who write about Derek Jeter.

A wise man once said that everything ends badly. Otherwise it wouldn’t end. Maybe that’s not 100% true, but it’s true often enough that wishing otherwise is just that. Wishing. And wishing is not a great look for the sporting press.

The Cubs will try to clinch the NL Central on Tuesday

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The Cubs soundly defeated the Cardinals on Monday night, 10-2, sending their magic number down to one. They will try to clinch the NL Central on Tuesday with another win against the Cardinals. Alternatively, if they lose, they can still clinch if the Brewers also lose on Tuesday.

The Cubs, of course, won the Central last year en route to winning their first World Series since 1908. It wasn’t nearly as easy this year as the club was below .500 entering June and was exactly at .500 entering July. A 16-8 July, 17-12 August, and 15-8 September have helped put the Cubs back in position to return to the postseason.

Not to be forgotten, the Cardinals were eliminated from NL Central contention with Monday’s loss. Now they have their sights set on the second NL Wild Card slot and currently trail the Rockies in that race.

The matchups for Tuesday’s action:

Carter Capps to undergo surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

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Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union Tribune reports that Padres pitcher Carter Capps will undergo surgery this offseason to address thoracic outlet syndrome, which doctors believe caused the right-hander’s blood clots. The Padres hope to have him ready by spring training next year.

Capps, 27, underwent Tommy John surgery last year and didn’t debut this season until August 7. He made 11 relief appearances, yielding nine runs on 12 hits and two walks with seven strikeouts in 12 1/3 innings. He went back on the DL on September 12 due to the blood clot issue.

The Padres acquired Capps from the Marlins last July in the Andrew Cashner trade which ended up having a lot of moving parts. Capps will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility this offseason. It’s quite possible the Padres choose to non-tender him.