Rob Manfred voted in as new MLB commissioner

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UPDATE: Manfred’s election was just made official in a press conference. Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com has some quotes:

6:16 p.m. ET: Manfred ended up being elected unanimously, which is a positive thing from an optics perspective, even though there was some objection.

6:04 p.m. ET: After a long day of deliberations in Baltimore, MLB owners have finally voted in Rob Manfred as Bud Selig’s successor as MLB commissioner.

Manfred, 55, will be the 10th commissioner in MLB history. Selig, who has served as commissioner since 1992, will retire when his contract expires on January 25, 2015.

Manfred was one of three candidates at the start of today, along with MLB’s Executive Vice President of Business Tom Brosnan and Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner. However, Brosnan dropped out of the race around midday. Manfred received 22 out of 30 votes in the balloting earlier this afternoon, leaving him one vote short of election, but the owners (likely with some serious convincing from Selig) were eventually able to bridge the gap and reach a consensus. Per the New York Daily News, the Blue Jays, Red Sox, White Sox, Nationals, Angels, Athletics, Diamondbacks, and Reds were the teams who initially backed Werner over Manfred.

Selig’s preferred successor, Manfred has been involved with baseball since 1987. He became MLB’s executive vice president for labor relations and human resources in 1998 before his role was expanded to include executive vice president of economics and league affairs in 2012. He was promoted the position of chief operating officer last September, reporting directly to Selig, a move which essentially signified that he was the heir apparent for the job. During his time with MLB, he has helped lead negotiations for three collective bargaining agreements (2002, 2006, and 2011) as well as the joint drug agreement.

Yankees GM Brian Cashman not considering demoting struggling Greg Bird

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Yankees first baseman Greg Bird gave his team tons of confidence to hand him the everyday job at first base to start the 2017 regular season, batting .451/.556/1.098 with eight home runs in 51 spring at-bats. But he’s followed that up by hitting .107/.254/.214 through the first month of the regular season.

GM Brian Cashman doesn’t have any intent to demote Bird back to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports. Cashman said, “It’s not even an option for me in my mind right now, at all.”

Bird didn’t start Sunday’s game against the Orioles, a 7-4 loss in 11 innings. Lefty Wade Miley started for the Orioles, prompting manager Joe Girardi to put Chris Carter into the lineup at first base. If Bird isn’t able to figure things out, Carter might have an increased role on the team.

Chris Archer threw behind Jose Bautista

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Rays starter Chris Archer threw his first pitch to Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista behind the slugger’s back with one out in the first inning of Sunday afternoon’s game in Toronto. Bautista and Archer then had a staredown. Home plate umpire Jim Wolf issued warnings to both teams. Bautista ultimately flied out to right field and he appeared to have a quick word with Archer on his way back to the dugout.

Archer could have been exacting revenge — euphemistically known as “protecting his teammate” — because Jays reliever Joe Biagini hit Rays outfielder Steven Souza in the seventh inning of Saturday’s game. Souza was forced to leave the game and underwent an X-ray, which came back negative. He was held out of Sunday’s lineup. Biagini’s pitch did not appear to be intentional.

The Jays won Sunday’s contest 3-1 with no further incident. The two clubs meet again in Tampa for a three-game series starting on May 5, so we’ll see if Sunday was the last of the bad blood between them.