Jayson Werth clocked at 105 m.p.h. in a 55 zone, is charged with reckless driving

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When I lived in Northern Virginia it was a miracle if you could get your car up to 55 m.p.h. anywhere in Fairfax County thanks to all the dumb traffic. Jayson Werth must know routes I didn’t know. Because according to Nats Enquirer, Werth was pulled over in early July and charged with reckless driving for going 105 mph in a 55-mph zone. He has a court date in November.

We never heard anything about it at the time, but Nats Enquirer found it by searching Fairfax County records. Putting lie to two cliches: (a) that bloggers don’t do journalism; and (b) only hot-headed, untamed horses who need to grow up and respect the game drive recklessly. Maybe those guys were just doing it wrong by driving 100 m.p.h. on straight roads with 65-70 m.p.h. speed limits in sparsely-populated rural areas. Maybe it’s better to do it in one of the most congested areas in the country.

In any event, anyone who got on Aroldis Chapman and Yasiel Puig’s case for their high-speed driving, wringing their hands about their lack of maturity, please call your editor. You have a column to write.

In other news, we should have seen this coming. Werth has always had trouble with stuff around 55:

(HUGE hat tip to Ulreh Vogt for that video. I almost spit out my coffee when he tweeted that)

Report: Orioles interested in Alex Cobb

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MLB Network’s Jon Morosi reports that the Orioles have interest in free agent right-hander Alex Cobb, who rejected his one-year, $17.4 million qualifying offer from the Rays earlier this week. Cobb was most recently linked to the Cubs, who reportedly reached out to his agent during the GM Meetings and garnered mutual interest from the righty, but nothing appears to be set in stone yet.

Cobb, 30, completed his sixth season with the Rays in 2017. He went 12-10 in 29 starts and turned in a respectable 3.66 ERA, 6.4 SO/9 and career-best 2.2 BB/9 in 179 1/3 innings. Despite losing a couple of weeks to turf toe, he remained healthy for most of the year and showed no signs of the elbow issues that robbed him of the majority of his 2015-2016 campaigns.

It’s still fairly early for any deals to come to fruition, but Morosi notes that the Orioles seem to be focused on bulking up their rotation during the first few months of the offseason. It’ll take more than a healthy Alex Cobb to right that ship, however: Orioles’ starters earned a collective 5.70 ERA and 5.5 fWAR in 2017, good for worst and fourth-worst marks in the league, respectively. Behind Kevin Gausman and Dylan Bundy (and perhaps Gabriel Ynoa/Miguel Castro), they still need three viable starters to compete in 2018. Whether or not they can afford to spring for a single starter with Cobb’s price tag (four years, $48 million, per MLB Trade Rumors) remains to be seen.