Caleb Joseph has homered in five consecutive games

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If you’re not familiar with the name Caleb Joseph, you’re not alone. The 28-year-old, drafted by the Orioles in the seventh round of the 2008 draft, made his major league debut on May 7 this season and has been playing regularly behind the dish since catcher Matt Wieters succumbed to a season-ending elbow injury.

On August 1, Joseph went 0-for-3 with a pair of strikeouts against the Mariners, dropping his batting average to .199 and his OPS to .577. Since then, though, Joseph has caught fire. His second-inning two-run home run against Cardinals starter John Lackey today was his fifth home run in his last five games. As MLB.com’s David Wilson notes, Joseph has become the 15th catcher to homer in five consecutive games. Reds catcher Devin Mesoraco also accomplished the feat earlier this season, between June 20-25.

The record for home runs in consecutive games by a catcher is six, held by Walker Cooper, a catcher for the New York Giants in 1947. The overall record is eight consecutive games with a home run, accomplished by three players: Dale Long (1956), Don Mattingly (1987), and Ken Griffey, Jr. (1993).

Including today’s 2-for-4 performance, Joseph is now slashing .227/.287/.429 with eight home runs and 21 RBI in 175 plate appearances.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.