George Springer’s setback is considered minor

1 Comment

Rookie slugger George Springer was forced to exit a minor league rehab game with Low-A Quad Cities last night after he aggravated his left quad strain, but Astros manager Bo Porter told Brian McTaggart of MLB.com earlier this evening that the setback is considered minor.

Springer hasn’t played in the majors since July 19. The initial plan called for him to complete three minor league rehab games before being activated tomorrow, but that’s no guarantee now. The 24-year-old outfielder will examined by the team training staff tomorrow at Minute Maid Park before the Astros decide how to proceed.

“He was going to have a day off regardless,” Porter said before Thursday’s series finale vs. the Phillies. “Obviously, with him having to come out of the game yesterday, we’ll send him through a workout [Friday] and see how he recovers, and if he doesn’t have any setbacks, we’ll make a decision at that point whether to activate him or give him more time.”

Springer has provided plenty of excitement for Astros fans since his major league debut in mid-April, compiling 20 home runs and an .804 OPS over 78 games.

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

Getty Images
5 Comments

Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.