Oakland Athletics v Cleveland Indians

The Indians are more popular than the Reds in Ohio

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I’m sure this doesn’t matter to most of you, but people ask me about it all the time. First, the numbers:

According to the latest Quinnipiac Poll, a total of 49 percent of Ohio adults say they are “very interested” or “somewhat interested” in Major League Baseball.

Among those fans, 42 percent say the Cleveland Indians are their favorite team, while 34 percent cheer for the Cincinnati Reds, with 4 percent for the Pittsburgh Pirates and 3 percent each for the Detroit Tigers, the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees.

Tigers and Pirates make sense because large parts of Ohio border western Pennsylvania and Michigan. Yankees and Red Sox make sense because most people are sheep/front-runners by nature.

Which also, I feel anyway, has a bit to do with the Indians besting the Reds in the poll. I realize that the Reds have been good a lot lately and the Indians come and go as contenders, but those 1990s Indians teams that won two pennants loom pretty large here.

Before the mid-90s (back when I was in college here) it seemed like the state skewed pretty strongly in favor of the Reds, with the Big Red Machine and the 1990 World Series team solidifying support. For example, when you drove around the state back then, convenience stores and bars and things outside of the Cleveland area were more likely to have Reds schedules and memorabilia on the walls. These days you see more Tribe things. That all changed during the Mike Hargrove/Jim Hart era and has basically stuck. Columbus, where I live, is split pretty much in two between Reds and Indians fans. The center point was clearly with the Reds in the early 90s. By the time I came back here after law school in 1998, the bubble had moved sharply in the Indians’ favor.

I figure this will hold unless and until the Reds go back to the World Series.

With Adam Jones ailing, Orioles add Borbon to outfield

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 13: Adam Jones #10 of the Baltimore Orioles reacts after being hit in the hand by a pitch in the sixth against the San Francisco Giants inning during an interleague game at AT&T Park on August 13, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK — With star outfielder Adam Jones nursing a tender hamstring, the Baltimore Orioles selected the contract of Julio Borbon from Double-A Bowie and optioned pitcher Mike Wright to Triple-A Norfolk.

Borbon was inserted in the starting lineup for Baltimore, batting ninth against hard-throwing New York Yankees rookie Chad Green.

“We had some other center field options,” manager Buck Showalter said. “Borbon is our best option at this point.”

Jones left Friday’s game in the second inning with a left hamstring strain. He departed the previous night’s game at Washington in the ninth inning with hamstring cramps and aggravated the injury hustling down the first base line on a soft grounder to third.

“I got a feeling that if he hadn’t had that first swinging bunt, it might not have been a problem,” Showalter indicated. “He’s not going to trot to first base as much as I talked to him about it before the game.”

Although Jones was unable to talk his way into Saturday’s lineup, Showalter speculated that he might be available to pinch-hit.

The 30-year old Borbon was 2 for 9 in five games with the Orioles earlier this season, but was designated for assignment on July 26. To create room for Borbon on the 40-man roster, pitcher Logan Ondrusek was designated for assignment on Friday.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.