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Dominican trainer says the Yankees reneged on an offer to a 16-year-old player

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Ben Badler of Baseball America has an interesting story about a complaint raised by a trainer/agent in the Dominican Republic. He says the Yankees had an agreement to sign his 16-year-old client, Christopher Torres, in June for $2.1 million. And that, indeed, the agreement to sign him come June was reached late last year. Then June 2 came around, the Yankees didn’t sign him, every other team’s bonus pool money was dried up and now Torres is in limbo.

The Yankees deny this, saying that while there were discussions, no offer was ever made. The team simply changed its mind and moved on. Worth noting, however, the MLB had a recent meeting with the Yankees about all of this. No one is talking about it, but it’s possible that someone somewhere thinks the Yankees violated the norms of the signing period.

But apart to Torres himself, the dispute itself is not as interesting for what happened here specifically, but for what it shows us about how international signings work in the capped bonus era.

Teams and teenagers reach handshake agreements — or maybe just nods across a room — months in advance. When they do, it gets disseminated through baseball, causing other teams to back off. This dance is happening earlier and earlier because of the limited amount of money MLB allows teams to spend on international free agents these days. Everyone needs to plan more and plan in advance. When teams’ plans change, however, the kids are the ones left with few options.

Some say the solution to all of this is an international draft. Others say that going back to a system where teams are not so severely limited on signing bonuses is the answer. I fall in the latter camp. Ask yourself: if the Yankees truly were high enough on this kid to offer him big dollars, might another team want to swoop in if he became available? They can’t, though, because by then they’re already tapped out.

It’s rough out there. The international signing game is full of crazy incentives and unfortunate stories like this.

All Marlins players will wear number 16 in honor of Jose Fernandez tonight

MIAMI, FL - JULY 09:  Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins pitches during the game against the Cincinnati Reds at Marlins Park on July 9, 2015 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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The Marlins game was understandably cancelled yesterday. The baseball schedule has always gone on in such situations, however, and the Marlins will host the Mets tonight in Miami.

As they do so, they will all be wearing number 16, Jose Fernandez’s number, in honor of their fallen teammate.

A nice gesture on what will certainly be an emotional night.

Derek Falvey named Twins new president of baseball operations.

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - JUNE 9: General view of interleague play between the Minnesota Twins and the Chicago Cubs at Target Field on June 9, 2012 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Minnesota Twins defeated the Chicago Cubs 11-3. (Photo by Adam Bettcher/Getty Images)
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ESPN’s Keith Law reports the Twins have hired Derek Falvey as their new president of baseball operations.

Falvey has been the Indians assistant general manager for the past year after spending a decade with the organization. He’s only 33 and he’s analytically-inclined. Which, given that the Twins front office has been particularly young or analytically-inclined, should be a pretty major change of pace. It’s also worth noting that going from one year of experience as an assistant general manager all the way to president of baseball operations — who will presumably oversee a general manager of his own — is a big, big jump. Either the Twins have a LOAD of confidence in Falvey or else they were having serious issues finding more experienced candidates. Of course both of those things could be true.

The Twins’ longtime general manager, Terry Ryan, was fired in July. The club lost its 100th game yesterday, marking only the second time since the franchise moved to Minnesota that it has lost that many games.