The Lester trade is a win-win

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I’m seeing a lot of people criticizing the Red Sox’ end of the Jon Lester trade. Saying that they wished they got more for him than Yoenis Cespedes. Prospects, perhaps. Hitters with more team control, as Cespedes is a free agent after 2015. Frankly, I think that’s wrong. I think this is a win-win trade.

For Oakland, it makes perfect sense. They are a legitimate World Series contender and when you’re a legitimate World Series contender, you do what you need to do. Adding one of the best starting pitchers in baseball is one of those things you do if the opportunity presents itself. Giving up a season and a half of a good but by no means indispensable outfielder like Cespedes is not a hard price to pay.

It’s more complicated for Boston, obviously, but it all comes down to what you think of the Red Sox’ chances to contend in 2015. If you think they’re sunk and need to rebuild, sure, you lament the fact that you didn’t get prospects. I don’t think that’s the case however. I don’t think it’s at all unreasonable to think they’ll bounce back in 2015 and adding Cespedes to what has been a troublesomely non-productive outfield is a big boost in that regard. No, he was not indispensable in Oakland, but he’s coming to a good hitters park in Boston and represents a solid upgrade. On defense too, where he will be paired in the outfield with Jackie Bradley Jr., giving the Sox some awesome D in the outfield.

The biggest question, obviously, is what Boston will do for pitching next year, especially if they trade John Lackey too, which is rumored. Well, I don’t know. But there’s no reason they can’t bid on Lester when he walks in free agency from Oakland (remember the A’s can’t give him a qualifying offer since he hasn’t been with the team all season). And the fact is, in this day and age it’s easier to add pitching in the offseason than it is to add a big bat. The Sox just added their big bat.

So don’t cry, anyone. This is a win-win.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time.¬†That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.