Kurt Suzuki stays in Minnesota, signs extension with Twins

9 Comments

All month the assumption has been that the Twins would either sign Kurt Suzuki to a contract extension or trade the 30-year-old impending free agent in the middle of his career-year.

Minutes after the trade deadline passed Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reports that Minnesota has indeed signed the All-Star catcher to an extension, with Tim Brown of Yahoo Sports saying it’s a two-year deal with a vesting option for 2017.

Signed for $2.75 million this offseason, Suzuki made his first All-Star team on the way to hitting .304 with a .753 OPS in 89 games. Of course, the reason he was available so cheaply is that Suzuki hit just .237 with a .650 OPS in 477 games from 2010-2013.

UPDATE: Suzuki will get $6 million in both 2015 and 2016 and the 2017 vesting option is for the same amount, so the money is certainly reasonable enough, but for better or worse extending a 30-year-old player in the midst of a career-year instead of cashing him in for prospects is a very Twins-style move.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”