Kurt Suzuki stays in Minnesota, signs extension with Twins


All month the assumption has been that the Twins would either sign Kurt Suzuki to a contract extension or trade the 30-year-old impending free agent in the middle of his career-year.

Minutes after the trade deadline passed Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reports that Minnesota has indeed signed the All-Star catcher to an extension, with Tim Brown of Yahoo Sports saying it’s a two-year deal with a vesting option for 2017.

Signed for $2.75 million this offseason, Suzuki made his first All-Star team on the way to hitting .304 with a .753 OPS in 89 games. Of course, the reason he was available so cheaply is that Suzuki hit just .237 with a .650 OPS in 477 games from 2010-2013.

UPDATE: Suzuki will get $6 million in both 2015 and 2016 and the 2017 vesting option is for the same amount, so the money is certainly reasonable enough, but for better or worse extending a 30-year-old player in the midst of a career-year instead of cashing him in for prospects is a very Twins-style move.

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.

MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”