Great Moments in Steroids Derp

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This story at ABC News is correct to note that, if it wasn’t for the 2005 PED hearings in Congress, far less attention would’ve been paid to the matter. I mean, yes, Jose Canseco’s book and Ken Caminiti’s comments in interviews really started things, but the Congressional hearings did go a long way in helping form public opinion on the matter.

For worse, I’d argue — baseball had already started its drug testing program at the time, the Congressional hearings were not really in Congress’ bailiwick and the public opinion that has been forged is, almost always, ill-informed and reactionary — but they did have an effect.

But there’s one thing those hearings did not do:

The Baseball Hall of Fame will add six new members to its ranks at this weekend’s ceremony in Cooperstown. Three superstar players and three brilliant managers – all of whom were active and clean of drug allegations during some of baseball’s darkest days – will get their plaques.

Though the now-famous congressional hearings drew criticism at the time, it’s quite possible baseball wouldn’t see a moment like this if not for Congress. The March 2005 session on steroids in baseball served as a wake-up call for baseball to clean itself up, ultimately opening the doors for the players who were clean during a tainted era to gain election to the Hall, according to ESPN baseball analyst Tim Kurkjian.

If you have an argument that Frank Thomas, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, Bobby Cox, Joe Torre and Tony La Russa wouldn’t be in the Hall of Fame but for the PEDs story becoming a big one, I’d really like to hear it.

Heck, here’s a better argument: if the PED issue had not been blown up and used for so much grandstanding, Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa and Rafael Palmeiro would be in the Hall, as would Bonds, Clemens, Bagwell and Biggio. With those off the ballot, other worthy candidates like Mike Mussina and Curt Schilling would have more votes and may be in now already.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.