Milton Bradley angry

Ray Rice is awful, but let’s not pretend baseball has a great record on domestic violence

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The sports media atmosphere has been sucked up by the Ray Rice/NFL/Stephen A. Smith/etc. story of the past week. Specifically, on how awful Rice’s actions were, how the NFL’s “punishment” of Rice was laughable and how Smith’s (and others’) response to it all showed that there are a lot of messed up attitudes about domestic violence floating around the sports world.

Today Mike Bates at SB Nation notes, however, that baseball’s closet is full of all kinds of domestic violence skeletons. And what’s worse, Major League Baseball has rarely if ever done anything about it. Bud Selig has never suspended anyone for it and in only a couple of instances did teams act, issuing short suspensions in those cases. It’s an eye-opening and at times stomach-churning read.

It’s an interesting and somewhat complicated thing to compare the NFL’s and Major League Baseball’s reactions to domestic violence (or drunk driving or any other off-the-field legal and/or deportment issue). On the one hand it’s legitimate to say that the NFL is awful because (a) it chose to weigh in on the severity and moral gravity of the offense in question; and (b) in doing so, definitively stated “eh, we don’t think knocking a woman unconscious is that bad.” On the other hand, Major League Baseball has utterly failed to weigh in at all. MLB may couch it in terms of it not wanting to weigh in in an area where law enforcement treads, or it may choose to emphasize the treatment/counseling services it provides players, but make no mistake: there is an implicit fear of bad public relations and a certain brand of moral cowardice at play in MLB’s stance on these matters too.  In some ways it’s the opposite of the PED thing: the NFL clearly has a problem and gets criticized for doing little to stop it, but MLB is no better and gets a pass since it keeps it all under wraps.

To be clear: the NFL does not get extra credit merely for doing something. What they did was to clearly state what its values are regarding domestic violence and those values are odious. At the same time, it’s possible that, if confronted with the same situation and inspired to weigh in, Major League Baseball would do more than the NFL did. No, there’s no reason to assume they would so in no way construe this as a defense of MLB, but they have at least taken the “it’s better to keep one’s mouth closed and be thought an idiot than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt” approach.

Maybe the strongest lesson to draw from this is that, when it comes to domestic violence, racism, drunk driving or any other offenses against laws or morals, it’s best not to have video or audio tape of the incident. Because I feel like neither the NFL or the NBA would have gone as far with Donald Sterling or Ray Rice if it wasn’t for that. And I feel like, if a highly publicized and recorded incident involving a baseball player came up, Major League Baseball would feel compelled to rethink its hands-off stance.

If and when such a thing occurs, I’d be very curious to see if MLB errs on the side of severe punishment or errs on the side of leniency.

Mike Piazza, Ken Griffey, Jr. inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame

COOPERSTOWN, NY - JULY 24:  Mike Piazza (L) and Ken Griffey Jr. pose with thier plaques at Clark Sports Center after the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony on July 24, 2016 in Cooperstown, New York.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
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As Craig previewed on Friday, catcher Mike Piazza and outfielder Ken Griffey, Jr. were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday. The Hall’s official Twitter account tweeted photos of each player’s plaque.

Junior, of course, should’ve been depicted with a backwards baseball cap in his plaque. He did put his cap on backwards during his speech.

Craig covered the analysis angle on Friday, so I’ll share my personal perspective.

As someone who grew up watching Piazza and Griffey, it’s cool to see them inducted into the Hall of Fame. As I’m not yet in my 30’s, I only recently got used to seeing my childhood favorites getting inducted into Cooperstown. Looking at the list, Barry Larkin was probably the first player inducted whose career I completely remember following. Since then, this time every July has made me feel pretty old, even if that’s not actually the case. It’s like, “It’s been six years since he retired already?”

If you were a kid growing up in the 1990’s and you played baseball, you mimicked Griffey’s swing. I was terrible at hitting, so it didn’t help me any, but it was a cool feeling when you did Junior’s signature waggle at the plate and connected with a pitch. And if you grew up with video games in the ’90’s, you probably also played his self-titled Super Nintendo Game:

Piazza is a special case, as I’m from southeast Pennsylvania. He was from nearby Norristown and Phoenixville, and as such was the pride of the state even if he spent most of his time across the country and, later, with the rival Mets. It wasn’t uncommon to see people hate the Mets’ guts but still cheer when Piazza homered, as long as it wasn’t against the Phillies. There was one particular home run which had everyone cheering, no matter their affiliation:

Congratulations to Griffey and Piazza for being immortalized into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday, a well-deserved honor.

The 2017 Hall of Fame ballot will bring back Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines, Trevor Hoffman, Curt Schilling, Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds, Edgar Martinez, Mike Mussina, Lee Smith, Fred McGriff, Jeff Kent, Larry Walker, Gary Sheffield, Billy Wagner, and Sammy Sosa. First-timers will include Ivan Rodriguez, Manny Ramirez, Vladimir Guerrero, Javier Vazquez, Mike Cameron, J.D. Drew, Jorge Posada, Magglio Ordonez, Derrek Lee, Tim Wakefield, Edgar Renteria, Melvin Mora, Carlos Guillen, Jason Varitek, Orlando Cabrera, Aaron Rowand, Pat Burrell, Freddy Sanchez, Arthur Rhodes, Julio Lugo, and Danys Baez.

White Sox suspend Chris Sale five games over Saturday’s clubhouse incident

HOUSTON, TX - JULY 02:  Chris Sale #49 of the Chicago White Sox pitches in the first inning against the Houston Astros at Minute Maid Park on July 2, 2016 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
Bob Levey/Getty Images
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White Sox starter Chris Sale was scratched from Saturday’s start against the Tigers due to a clubhouse incident. It turns out Sale wasn’t happy that the White Sox wanted to use throwback uniforms that featured collars. Sale reportedly cut up his uniform and got into a heated argument with front office staff.

The White Sox released a statement on Sunday, announcing that Sale has been suspended five games. White Sox senior vice president and general manager Rick Hahn said, “Chris has been suspended for violating team rules, for insubordination, and for destroying team equipment.”

Hahn continued, “While we all appreciate Chris’ talent and passion, there is a correct way and an incorrect way to express concerns about team rules and organizational expectations.”

Matt Albers made a spot start in Sale’s place on Saturday against the Tigers. He gave up one run on one hit with one strikeout in two innings of work before giving way to the bullpen.

Sale, 27, has been mentioned in trade rumors lately with the August 1 non-waiver trade deadline approaching. The White Sox reportedly turned down a “king’s ransom” for Sale recently, but one wonders if the clubhouse incident might motivate the club to make a trade.