Lucas Giolito AP

Injury disclosures loom large for future MLB drafts


When the Houston Astros selected Brady Aiken with the first pick of the 2014 MLB draft, many viewed Aiken as the best prep pitcher available in the draft. The previous September saw the lefty lead USA Baseball’s 18-and-under national team to the 18U World Cup. Yet less than one week before the July 18 signing deadline, the Astros had not signed their top pick to the long-rumored $6.5 million signing bonus.

Aiken’s advisor, Casey Close, made his thoughts public through Ken Rosenthal, stating that they were “extremely disappointed that Major League Baseball is allowing the Astros to conduct business in this manner with a complete disregard for the rules governing the draft and the 29 other clubs who have followed those same rules.” The issue emerged that Aiken’s physical, which occurred after the Astros and Aiken agreed to a signing bonus, revealed a smaller than normal ulnar collateral ligament. The Astros thought the smaller UCL would increase the chances of having elbow injuries. Close noted that Aiken was asymptomatic, and was able to touch 97 mph with his fastball during his final start.

Prior to the deadline, the Astros raised their signing bonus offer to a rumored $5 million. Aiken declined, and appears likely to go to college. (It’s unclear if he’ll attend UCLA or go to a junior college so he will be eligible for the 2015 draft.)

Injuries often cause prospects to drop in the draft. Barret Loux, drafted sixth overall by the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2010, agreed to a $2 million signing bonus, but was declared a free agent after failing his physical due; the Diamondbacks declined to offer him a contract. Another was Lucas Giolito, drafted in 2012.

He was viewed as a potential first overall pick, which would make him the first prep pitcher at No. 1 since Brien Taylor in 1991, and the first right-handed prep pitcher in the history of the draft. In March of 2012, just three months before the draft, Lucas took himself out of a game after feeling pain in his right elbow. Tests were preformed and it was determined that Lucas had a strained Ulnar Collateral Ligament. His UCL was not torn, meaning he would not need Tommy John surgery.

It was that potential injury that ties Giolito to Aiken and could have a ripple effect on future MLB drafts.

Giolito’s father, Rick, recently questioned an article on the Houston Chronicle’s website that stated that “teams don’t see MRIs before the draft.” He says his son’s experience says otherwise.

“All draft-eligible players are required to submit complete medical histories to Major League Baseball, which includes MRIs, X-Rays, etc., prior to the draft,” Rick Giolito says. “MLB is responsible for delivering copies of medical history to the individual teams. Lucas’ injury occurred prior to the MLB deadline for delivery of Draftee Medical Histories,” so the information provided including information regarding what was then determined to be a strained Ulnar Collateral Ligament.

The Washington Nationals drafted Lucas Giolito with the 16th overall pick. His father says no additional medical information was provided, nor were any medical tests performed between the draft and when the Nationals and Giolito reached an agreement for a reported $2.925 million signing bonus, which was $800,000 higher than the allotted slot value. The bonus was close to the maximum that Giolito could receive without the Nationals being forced for forfeit a future draft pick. And that’s when, Giolito says, teams can do a full physical exam.

“Lucas had the standard work-up for a pitcher,” he says.

After the physical is completed, the team’s front office reviews the results with their team doctor(s). Then the team makes the decision to sign a player whether he passes a physical or not. As noted by Rick Giolito, “it would be extremely difficult to pre-negotiate for every possible medical contingency,” but was unable to go into specifics regarding Lucas’ contract.

Lucas Giolito pitched two innings in August, and the pain he felt in March returned, necessitating Tommy John surgery. After missing approximately one year, he returned with aplomb in late 2013, and has shown flashes of brilliance in 2014, dominating the Low-A South Atlantic League for the Hagerstown Suns.

As elbow injuries become more prevalent in baseball, the issues caused by pre-existing injuries such as those experienced by Giolito and Loux could lead to more disagreements, such as the one between Aiken and the Astros that was played out on a public stage. The parties that experienced the most collateral damage were Jacob Nix (Houston’s 5th-round pick) and Mac Marshall (taken in the 21st), who reportedly agreed to above-slot agreements that were not executed due to the Astros’ and Aiken’s inability to reach an agreement.

Major League Baseball Players Association executive director Tony Clark has indicated that the MLBPA will look into the situation. But it’s clear this precedent set by MLB with Loux, coupled with the interest from MLBPA and the national media, could lead to a resolution that has ripple effects on the draft.

Video: Jonathan Lucroy who? Roberto Perez homers twice in World Series opener for the Indians

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Roberto Perez #55 of the Cleveland Indians hits a three-run home run during the eighth inning against the Chicago Cubs in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
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Back in July, then-Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy vetoed a trade that would have sent him to the Indians, helping the club make a significant upgrade behind the plate after losing Yan Gomes to an injury. At the time, Roberto Perez had only played in 11 games, batting .043. Gomes had hit .165 before his injury, and Chris Gimenez batted .202 over 42 games. It was not much of a logical leap to think the Indians would eventually falter due to a lack of production at the catching position.

But here the Indians are in the World Series facing the Cubs. In Game 1 on Tuesday night, Perez — who finished the season with a .183 average and three home runs in 184 plate appearances — drilled a pair of home runs, accounting for four of the six runs the Indians would score in a shutout win over the Cubs.

Perez’s first blast was a solo that that just cleared the left field fence at Progressive Field, coming on an 0-1 fastball from starter Jon Lester. That padded the Indians’ lead to 3-0.

The second homer put the game away, as he punished reliever Hector Rondon for hanging a 2-2 slider with two runners on base, slugging this one enough to clear the left field fence by plenty. That doubled the Indians’ lead to 6-0, the score by which they would eventually win.

Perez is the first catcher to homer twice in a World Series game since Gary Carter did it for the Mets against the Red Sox in the 1986 World Series. Perez is the first Indian to homer twice in the same playoff game since Jim Thome in the 1999 ALDS against the Red Sox.

Corey Kluber dazzles as Indians blank Cubs 6-0 in Game 1 of the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians throws a pitch against the Chicago Cubs during the first inning in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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From the moment Kris Bryant struck out looking for the second out of the first inning in Game 1 of the World Series, the Cubs knew Indians starter Corey Kluber brought his A-game and that they were in for a long night. Bryant was Kluber’s second strikeout victim in as many batters and he would go on to strike out eight batters through the first three innings, setting a World Series record.

The Indians, meanwhile, gave Kluber an early cushion, scoring twice in the bottom of the first inning. Francisco Lindor hit a two-out single, then stole second base against starter Jon Lester. Lester proceeded to walk Mike Napoli and Carlos Santana to load the bases. Jose Ramirez brought one run home with an infield single to the left of the pitcher’s mound. The lefty then hit Brandon Guyer with a pitch to force in another run, giving the Indians a 2-0 lead.

The Indians scored one more run in the fourth inning when catcher Roberto Perez snuck a solo home run over the fence in left field, victimizing Lester yet again.

The Cubs struggled to get any kind of momentum going, wasting a leadoff double by Ben Zobrist in the second inning and a two-out double by Kyle Schwarber in the fourth. Through six innings, Kluber yielded only three hits with zero walks and nine strikeouts. He took the mound to start the seventh but departed after Zobrist led off with a single to left field.

Reliever and ALCS MVP Andrew Miller entered the game, but the Cubs seemed to have a better time against him. Schwarber drew a walk and Javier Baez singled to left, loading the bases. At the very least, it seemed, Miller would give up at least one run, if not two. The average team scored two runs with the bases loaded and no outs, according to Baseball Prospectus. But Miller showed why he was named the MVP of the ALCS, getting Willson Contreras to fly out to shallow center. Schwarber thought the ball would drop, so he was way off the second base bag, but center fielder Rajai Davis didn’t notice and fired home to ensure a run didn’t score. Despite the mistake, Miller rebounded by striking out Addison Russell and David Ross to escape the inning with no damage done

Miller returned to the mound for the eighth inning for his second inning of work. After getting Dexter Fowler to fly out, he walked Bryant. Miller got Anthony Rizzo to fly out to shallow center, but Zobrist singled to center to put runners on first and third with two outs. On his 46th pitch of the night, Miller struck out Schwarber to escape the inning.

Perez decided to double the Indians’ lead to 6-0 in the bottom of the eighth. Cubs reliever Justin Grimm walked Guyer and allowed a single to Lonnie Chisenhall, forcing manager Joe Maddon to replace him with Hector Rondon. Rondon hung a 2-2 slider and Perez crushed it, this time clearing the fence by plenty for a three-run homer. He’s the first catcher with two homers in a World Series game since Gary Carter in 1986.

Closer Cody Allen, who thought he was going to be used in a save situation, took over in the top of the ninth. After striking out Baez, Contreras doubled to right field. Allen then struck out Russell as well as pinch-hitter Miguel Montero to end the game in a 6-0 victory for the Indians.

Game 2 of the World Series will start an hour earlier than usual on Wednesday due to forecasted inclement weather late at night. Jake Arrieta will make the start for the Cubs opposite the Indians’ Trevor Bauer.