Tim Lincecum

Tim Lincecum saves it for utterly spent Giants


PHILADELPHIA – The Giants’ 9-6 victory over the Phillies lasted 14 innings, involved 16 pitchers throwing 507 times to the plate, took five hours and 46 minutes, included more cramping than a track meet for septuagenarians and it finally ended 7 minutes before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning at Citizens Bank Park when Tim Lincecum really and truly recorded his first career save.

“Eck!” shouted Giants coach Shawon Dunston, as Lincecum met with reporters.

“Not without the mustache,” said Lincecum, who is clean-shaven again but for the soul patch.

Rather than rehash every draining detail, which is conveniently available for your digestion in the Instant Replay, let’s jump straight into the zany aftermath.

This is what you didn’t know while you were watching:

–Giants manager Bruce Bochy and interim pitching coach Mark Gardner decided prior to the game to hold off having Lincecum throw his side session, just in case they came upon an emergency-glass situation. Makes sense. Their long guy all season, Yusmeiro Petit, was starting and George Kontos threw two of the bullpen’s six innings the previous night. That turned out to be a prescient thought.

–If the Giants hadn’t taken the lead on Brandon Crawford’s three-run double in the 14th, Lincecum wouldn’t have appeared in the bottom of the inning when Kontos ran out of gas with one out and two aboard.

“I was only going to use Lincecum in that situation, with a lead,” Bochy said.

–If the game had remained tied in the 14th, the next pitcher after Kontos would’ve been left fielder Tyler Colvin, Bochy said.

“I asked him if he’d pitched before and he said high school,” said Bochy, and as a side note, Brandon Belt would’ve been forever jealous if that would have happened.

–Lincecum is still good to go Friday against the Dodgers at AT&T Park. He went down to the bullpen in the 13th and ended up throwing 21 pitches. And yes, as he jogged out to the mound, he did think back to his relief appearance here in Game 6 of the 2010 NLCS.

“Just get outs,” he said, asked his mindset. “Really, just try to keep my teammate’s runs from scoring. … That just shows a lot from our guys. Putting in all that work that they did, you want to make sure it isn’t for nothing.”

Lincecum did allow one of his two inherited runners to score, on a ground out. He wasn’t happy about that. It was the only run Giants relievers have allowed in 15 innings over two games here.

–Yes, a pitcher has thrown a no-hitter and recorded a save in the same season. Sandy Koufax actually did it three times, in 1962, ’64 and ’65.

–How did Hector Sanchez, who caught all 248 pitches, look to Lincecum in the 14th?

“Like he was wearing it pretty good,” said Lincecum, “and I wasn’t helping the cause.”

Sanchez was cramping up between pitches. Afterward, he did shirtless jumping jacks on his way to the shower, and yelled out, “I’m ready to go tomorrow!” He was joking, of course.

–Kontos threw 40 pitches one night after he threw 21, and said he could give Bochy a couple batters if needed on Wednesday. I’m pretty sure he wasn’t joking.

“I pride myself on being able to do this kind of thing,” said Kontos, who began his pro career as a starter.

–The Giants’ nine pitchers matched the second most used in a game in all-time franchise history. They used 11 in an 11-inning loss in 2012 against the Diamondbacks at AT&T Park. Oddly enough, Kontos, the winning pitcher in both of these games in Philadelphia, took the loss that day.

–Bochy said he didn’t anticipate a roster move despite the heavy bullpen usage. Jeremy Affeldt threw 39 pitches and will be off-limits, and so will Kontos no matter what he says. But other guys went short enough to be available. Regardless, Wednesday night would be an excellent time for Madison Bumgarner to flirt with a complete game.

–Madison Bumgarner had a hitter’s shin guard strapped to his leg pretty much from the 11th inning on, which shouldn’t surprise you. He wasn’t used. Tim Hudson and Ryan Vogelsong were the only other Giants who didn’t get into the game.

–Buster Posey had four hits, finished a triple short of the cycle, matched his career high with three extra-base hits, improved to 10 for 23 on the trip (.435) and took the team lead with 53 RBIs. His tying, ninth-inning home run off Jonathan Papelbon was the first the Phillies’ closer had allowed all season. He had faced 148 batters before Posey took him deep.

“He’s a good player, and when those players get in that zone, they’re fun to watch,” Bochy said.

It wouldn’t have been as much fun for Posey if he had started behind the plate.

–Crawford, who earlier in the game committed his second error in two nights, had what might have ranked among his biggest hits ever against a right-hander. He was batting .207 against them entering the game but his three-run double off Jeff Manship snapped a tie in the 14th.

“They were getting a little tired,” said Crawford, asked if he had his legs under him. “I think everybody’s were. I tried to keep it simple. We only needed one run. I tried to stay compact, more than earlier in the game, and hit it on the barrel.”

–Bochy cancelled batting practice and players will arrive later than usual on Wednesday. Strength and conditioning coach Carl Kochan yelled to Sanchez to meet him at 2 p.m. to run stadium stairs. He was joking. Even if he were serious, Sanchez would not be running stadium stairs.

–Joe Panik’s ankle swelled up after he sprained it while trying to avoid pitcher Roberto Hernandez’s foot at first base in the first inning. He was replaced in the bottom of the second. He expects to be out two days or so, but the Giants aren’t discussing the disabled list.

–Because of Panik’s injury, Ehire Adrianza had seven at-bats in a game he didn’t start, which established an all-time Giants franchise record. The previous mark of six at-bats (also plate appearances) was done many times, last by Harry Spilman in 1986.

(Yuniesky Betancourt was the last big leaguer to come off the bench and get seven at-bats, for the Royals in 2012. The major league record is nine – and 10 plate appearances, too – by Tom Paciorek for the White Sox in 1984.)

–Finally, Panik’s parents earned the Croix de Broad Street. They were among the select few who stayed for the entire game.

“A couple friends, too,” he said. “They’re troopers.”

Them, and everyone else on the visiting side.

Video: Jonathan Lucroy who? Roberto Perez homers twice in World Series opener for the Indians

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Roberto Perez #55 of the Cleveland Indians hits a three-run home run during the eighth inning against the Chicago Cubs in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
Gregory Shamus/Getty Images
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Back in July, then-Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy vetoed a trade that would have sent him to the Indians, helping the club make a significant upgrade behind the plate after losing Yan Gomes to an injury. At the time, Roberto Perez had only played in 11 games, batting .043. Gomes had hit .165 before his injury, and Chris Gimenez batted .202 over 42 games. It was not much of a logical leap to think the Indians would eventually falter due to a lack of production at the catching position.

But here the Indians are in the World Series facing the Cubs. In Game 1 on Tuesday night, Perez — who finished the season with a .183 average and three home runs in 184 plate appearances — drilled a pair of home runs, accounting for four of the six runs the Indians would score in a shutout win over the Cubs.

Perez’s first blast was a solo that that just cleared the left field fence at Progressive Field, coming on an 0-1 fastball from starter Jon Lester. That padded the Indians’ lead to 3-0.

The second homer put the game away, as he punished reliever Hector Rondon for hanging a 2-2 slider with two runners on base, slugging this one enough to clear the left field fence by plenty. That doubled the Indians’ lead to 6-0, the score by which they would eventually win.

Perez is the first catcher to homer twice in a World Series game since Gary Carter did it for the Mets against the Red Sox in the 1986 World Series. Perez is the first Indian to homer twice in the same playoff game since Jim Thome in the 1999 ALDS against the Red Sox.

Corey Kluber dazzles as Indians blank Cubs 6-0 in Game 1 of the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians throws a pitch against the Chicago Cubs during the first inning in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
Jamie Squire/Getty Images

From the moment Kris Bryant struck out looking for the second out of the first inning in Game 1 of the World Series, the Cubs knew Indians starter Corey Kluber brought his A-game and that they were in for a long night. Bryant was Kluber’s second strikeout victim in as many batters and he would go on to strike out eight batters through the first three innings, setting a World Series record.

The Indians, meanwhile, gave Kluber an early cushion, scoring twice in the bottom of the first inning. Francisco Lindor hit a two-out single, then stole second base against starter Jon Lester. Lester proceeded to walk Mike Napoli and Carlos Santana to load the bases. Jose Ramirez brought one run home with an infield single to the left of the pitcher’s mound. The lefty then hit Brandon Guyer with a pitch to force in another run, giving the Indians a 2-0 lead.

The Indians scored one more run in the fourth inning when catcher Roberto Perez snuck a solo home run over the fence in left field, victimizing Lester yet again.

The Cubs struggled to get any kind of momentum going, wasting a leadoff double by Ben Zobrist in the second inning and a two-out double by Kyle Schwarber in the fourth. Through six innings, Kluber yielded only three hits with zero walks and nine strikeouts. He took the mound to start the seventh but departed after Zobrist led off with a single to left field.

Reliever and ALCS MVP Andrew Miller entered the game, but the Cubs seemed to have a better time against him. Schwarber drew a walk and Javier Baez singled to left, loading the bases. At the very least, it seemed, Miller would give up at least one run, if not two. The average team scored two runs with the bases loaded and no outs, according to Baseball Prospectus. But Miller showed why he was named the MVP of the ALCS, getting Willson Contreras to fly out to shallow center. Schwarber thought the ball would drop, so he was way off the second base bag, but center fielder Rajai Davis didn’t notice and fired home to ensure a run didn’t score. Despite the mistake, Miller rebounded by striking out Addison Russell and David Ross to escape the inning with no damage done

Miller returned to the mound for the eighth inning for his second inning of work. After getting Dexter Fowler to fly out, he walked Bryant. Miller got Anthony Rizzo to fly out to shallow center, but Zobrist singled to center to put runners on first and third with two outs. On his 46th pitch of the night, Miller struck out Schwarber to escape the inning.

Perez decided to double the Indians’ lead to 6-0 in the bottom of the eighth. Cubs reliever Justin Grimm walked Guyer and allowed a single to Lonnie Chisenhall, forcing manager Joe Maddon to replace him with Hector Rondon. Rondon hung a 2-2 slider and Perez crushed it, this time clearing the fence by plenty for a three-run homer. He’s the first catcher with two homers in a World Series game since Gary Carter in 1986.

Closer Cody Allen, who thought he was going to be used in a save situation, took over in the top of the ninth. After striking out Baez, Contreras doubled to right field. Allen then struck out Russell as well as pinch-hitter Miguel Montero to end the game in a 6-0 victory for the Indians.

Game 2 of the World Series will start an hour earlier than usual on Wednesday due to forecasted inclement weather late at night. Jake Arrieta will make the start for the Cubs opposite the Indians’ Trevor Bauer.