Cliff Lee struggles in first start back from disabled list

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Plenty of scouts were in attendance tonight for Cliff Lee’s first start in the majors in over two months. They likely didn’t come away impressed.

Lee, sidelined since May 18 with a left elbow strain, allowed six runs over 5 2/3 innings against the Giants. He tied a career-high by giving up 12 hits. The first 10 hits were singles, but he gave up a double to Joaquin Arias and a home run to Adam Duvall in his final inning of work. Sitting mostly in the high-80s with his fastball, he threw 59 out of 90 pitches for strikes while walking one and striking out three.

Lee projects to make just one more start before the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline, so he’s running out of time to prove his health and effectiveness to contenders. Of course, a deal could still happen in August, but it’s a bit more complicated. The 35-year-old is owed around $12 million for the rest of this season and $25 million for next season while his contract includes a $27.5 million vesting option or $12.5 million buyout for 2016.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.