Odrisamer Despaigne loses his no-hitter with two outs in the eighth inning

8 Comments

Update (6:35 PM ET): Despaigne lost his no-hitter after recording back-to-back strikeouts of Kirk Nieuwenhuis and Curtis Granderson. Daniel Murphy ripped a high fastball for a double to left-center. David Wright followed up with a ground ball single up the middle to score Murphy. Despaigne departs having allowed the one run and two hits over 7 2/3 innings. He walked three, hit two batters, and struck out five on 123 pitches.

Padres starter Odrisamer Despaigne has no-hit the Mets through seven innings this afternoon. He hasn’t been perfect by any means, as he has walked three and hit two batters with baseballs. He loaded the bases with two outs on two walks and a hit batter before escaping the seventh. Despaigne will enter the eighth inning having thrown 100 pitches.

Catcher Yasmani Grandal gave his pitcher some run support, blasting a solo home run to right-center off of Zack Wheeler in the fourth inning. The Padres have scratched out eight hits but have managed only the one run.

Despaigne, making his fifth career start, has been great for the Padres. He entered the afternoon with a 1.35 ERA and a 12/8 K/BB ratio over 26 2/3 innings.

We’ll keep you updated as Despaigne progresses through the game in an attempt to throw the first no-hitter in Padres history. The Mets were last victims of a no-hitter on September 8, 1993, when Astros starter Darryl Kile accomplished the feat. The Padres, of course, watched a no-hitter earlier this season when Giants starter Tim Lincecum held them hitless on June 25.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

Getty Images
3 Comments

Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.