Blue Jays, Giants “taking their best shot” at Chase Utley


Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe drops the following blurb in his weekly Sunday notes column

Chase Utley, 2B, Phillies — Right now it doesn’t appear that Utley is going anywhere because he can invoke his 10-5 rights and it looks as if he wants to remain in Philadelphia. But there’s time. And it hasn’t stopped teams such as the Blue Jays and Giants from taking their best shot, and they likely will through the end of the month.

Toronto second basemen — a mix of Steve Tolleson, Brett Lawrie, Munenori Kawasaki, Ryan Goins, and a couple others — have posted a combined .254/.312/.365 batting line this season. And the Giants just got Marco Scutaro back from the disabled list but can’t count on him to play every day and stay healthy.

Utley is hitting .289/.347/.441 with eight home runs and 46 RBI in 93 games this season at age 35. “I guess we’d have to see at that point,” he told’s Todd Zolecki in late June when asked about the possibility of being shopped at the July 31 trade deadline. “But I don’t plan on going anywhere.”

Utley is making $15 million this season, owed $15 million next season, and holds $15 million vesting options for the 2016-2018 campaigns. They vest if he reaches 500 plate appearances in the year previous.

Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

Rob Tringali/Getty Images

Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.