The guy who’s safe is out. The guy who’s out is safe.

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In the first inning of Friday’s Brewers-Nationals game, Anthony Rendon hit a grounder to short with Denard Span running from first on the pitch. Span beat the relay to second and was called safe, but Rendon was easily retired at first on the play.

At least, that’s how it seemed to go down.

After originally calling Span out, second base umpire Angel Campos changed his mind and ruled Span out, seemingly declaring that his popup slide interfered with Scooter Gennett’s relay to first base. And he probably had a case… Span had no need to stand up as quickly as he did, and if he had actually forced Gennett to alter his throw in any way, interference would have made a ton of sense.

Span, though, didn’t get in the path of the ball. And Gennett had no problem completing the relay, as evidenced by the fact that Rendon was easily retired at first. So, with Span also out, the ruling on the field was that of a double play.

Of course, Matt Williams was none too happy with this. But there was nothing reviewable he could challenge. Fortunately, the umps got together to discuss things, and what ended up happening was that Span was still ruled out — unintentional interference being the official call — and Rendon was credited with first base, since Span’s interference created a deadball situation.

So, when all was said and done, the guy who was safe was out and the guy who was out was safe.

Dodgers designate Sergio Romo for assignment

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The Dodgers announced on Thursday that the club activated pitcher Grant Dayton from the 10-day disabled list and designated pitcher Sergio Romo for assignment.

Dayton, 29, went on the disabled list earlier this month with neck stiffness. He’ll resume with a 3.63 ERA and a 20/12 K/BB ratio in 22 1/3 innings.

Romo, 34, signed a one-year, $3 million deal with the Dodgers in February. It didn’t really work out, as the right-hander posted a 6.12 ERA with a 31/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. His peripherals are still decent, so it wouldn’t be surprising if a team in need of a bullpen arm makes a deal with the Dodgers within the week.

Nate Karns underwent season-ending surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

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MLB.com’s Jeffrey Flanagan reports that Royals pitcher Nate Karns underwent surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome on Wednesday. He’s expected to be ready for spring training next year. Karns went on the disabled list in May with an elbow injury and didn’t make much progress.

The Royals acquired Karns from the Mariners in January in exchange for outfielder Jarrod Dyson. Over eight starts and one relief appearance, the 29-year-old right-hander compiled a 4.17 ERA and a 51/13 K/BB ratio in 45 1/3 innings.

Karns will enter his first of three years of arbitration eligibility after the season, so he’ll be under the Royals’ control through 2020.