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The Astros did not sign number one overall pick Brady Aiken. This is a big deal.

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The signing deadline for players selected in this year’s Rule 4 draft came and went at 5PM Eastern. And the number one overall pick, Brady Aiken, did not sign with the Houston Astros, reports Jim Callis of MLB.com.

If you aren’t up to speed, the Astros selected Aiken with the first overall pick and the parties agreed to a $6.5 million bonus in early June. But following a physical on June 23, the Astros became concerned about something in his left elbow and subsequently offered Aiken $3,168,840. Aiken’s agent, Casey Close, lashed out at the Astros, saying there was nothing wrong with Aiken and the Astros were trying to play hardball in an effort to manipulate their bonus pool to sign other players. Tony Clark of the MLBPA waded in to the controversy as well, saying on Tuesday that he was “disappointed” in how the Astros were dealing with Aiken.

Moments ago, following Callis’ report, Astros GM Jeff Luhnow told Evan Drellich of the Houston Chronicle that “[w]e tried to engage Casey Close three times today … there was no interest.”

The technical fallout: Aiken now has a choice: he can attend UCLA (assuming his dealings with close don’t burn his eligibility), and not be eligible for the draft until 2017. Or, he can play at a junior college or in an independent league and be eligible for the 2015 draft. From the Astros side, since their offer to Aiken was at least 40% of the his slot value (it was exactly that, actually) they will be given the number two overall pick in next year’s draft as compensation in addition to whatever pick they have.

The practical fallout for Aiken: he has to wait a year or maybe three to cash in and when he does it’s unlikely that he’ll do as well as he was set to do this year. And many, depending on how much stock they put in the Astros’ word on Aiken’s health, may consider him damaged goods.

The practical fallout for the Astros, they will be without a top pick. This, a year after their 2013 top pick, Mark Appel, has struggled mightily. More significantly, they may have their reputation among agents and future draft picks substantially damaged. Of course, it’s also the case that we don’t know — and likely can’t know due to confidentiality concerns — what the Astros saw in Aiken’s elbow. If it was legitimately serious, well, maybe they’re just being prudent. At the same time, Casey Close is not a bomb-thrower, and his reaction to all of this was pretty sharp. That he is as angry with the team as he has been suggests some seriously toxic dealings between the parties that many may read in his favor and negatively toward the Astros.

Ultimately, though, this blew up and there will likely be some heavy consequences for both sides. All over a tad north of $3 million, which is less than the Houston Astros are paying Jose Veras this year.

David Robertson and adventures with the win statistic

CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 26:  David Robertson #30 of the Chicago White Sox pitches in the 9th inning for a save against the Toronto Blue Jays at U.S. Cellular Field on June 26, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox defeated the Blue Jays 5-2.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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David Robertson got the win in both White Sox victories today, a double-header versus the Tigers. In the first game, he got the final out of the eighth inning and pitched a scoreless ninth before the White Sox walked off on an Adam Eaton RBI single.

It was the second game that made things interesting. Robertson took the mound at the start of the ninth inning staked to a 4-1 lead. He’d fork up a leadoff home run to Nick Castellanos. Then, after getting two outs, served up another solo shot to Tyler Collins followed by a game-tying Jarrod Saltalamacchia dinger. Robertson would get out of the inning without any further damage.

In the bottom of the ninth, Melky Cabrera sent the White Sox home winners again, drilling a walk-off RBI single. That gave Robertson the win, his second of the afternoon. As Baseball Tonight notes on Twitter, Robertson is the first player in the last 100 years to give up three home runs in an inning or fewer and still wind up with the victory.

Robertson has had a rough go of it since the All-Star break. He yielded four runs in his first appearance back on July 18. On the season, he’s saved 23 games in 27 appearances with a 4.46 ERA and a 50/21 K/BB ratio in 40 2/3 innings.

Diamondbacks have told teams that Shelby Miller is available in a trade

PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 06:  Shelby Miller #26 of the Arizona Diamondbacks delivers a pitch during the first inning against the San Diego Padres at Chase Field on July 6, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images)
Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images
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Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reported on Sunday afternoon that the Diamondbacks have told other teams that starter Shelby Miller is available in a trade. Obviously, Miller’s stock has fallen steeply since the club acquired him from the Braves over the winter.

Miller, 25, was recently optioned to Triple-A Reno after his struggles continued following his return from the disabled list. Over 14 starts in the majors, Miller went 2-9 with a 7.14 ERA and a 50/34 K/BB ratio in 69 1/3 innings. In his only start with Reno thus far, Miller yielded three runs on four hits and two walks with 10 strikeouts over 6 2/3 innings.

In their trade with the Braves, the Diamondbacks acquired Miller and minor leaguer Gabe Speier in exchange for 2015 first overall pick Dansby Swanson, pitching prospect Aaron Blair, and outfielder Ender Inciarte. It’s a trade that, if they could undo it, the D-Backs would in a heartbeat.