Luke Scott released from Korean team after calling coach a “liar” and a “coward”

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Luke Scott has always been a man with strong opinions which he is not afraid to offer at a moment’s notice. And the consequences of such opinions are not always something one gets the impression Scott considers too strongly. Now it seems that this quality has cost him what is likely his last job as a professional baseball player.

Scott has been released by his Korean team, SK Wyverns, for being “disrespectful” towards a coach. The Korea Times reports that Scott called the coach a “coward” and a “liar” following a dispute regarding Scott being placed on the disabled list. Scott has his own way of rehabbing from an injury, it seems, and the team had another. You’d think by now Scott would know that, no matter how right he thinks he is about that, insulting the boss is probably not the best way to deal with it.

Scott hit .241/.326/.415 with nine home runs and 40 RBI in 91 games the Rays last year. He’s 36 now and is a .258/.340/.481 career hitter who can only play a corner or DH. As a result, I feel like we have probably seen the last of Luke Scott as an active player.

Jered Weaver dealing with “dead arm”

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Padres starter Jered Weaver lasted just two-thirds of an inning in Wednesday afternoon’s Cactus League appearance against the Royals. He yielded four runs on three hits, throwing 31 pitches before getting pulled. His spring ERA now sits at an ugly 10.13.

Weaver said he’s been dealing with a “dead arm” since his last bullpen session, but added he’s dealt with the issue in previous springs, Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

The Padres signed Weaver to a one-year, $3 million contract last month. The right-hander is coming off of the worst season of his 11-year career. His fastball averaged a career-low 83 MPH and he put up a 5.06 ERA with a 103/51 K/BB ratio in 178 innings.

Ian Kinsler doesn’t think Puerto Rico or Dominican Republic players play the game the right way

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Update: Whoops…

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Earlier, Craig wrote about Dan Duquette’s dogwhistle language in his criticism of Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista. We have some more dogwhistling, this time coming from Tigers (and Team U.S.) second baseman Ian Kinsler. Via Billy Witz of The New York Times:

I hope kids watching the W.B.C. can watch the way we play the game and appreciate the way we play the game as opposed to the way Puerto Rico plays or the Dominican plays. That’s not taking anything away from them. That just wasn’t the way we were raised. They were raised differently and to show emotion and passion when you play. We do show emotion; we do show passion. But we just do it in a different way.

The goal of the World Baseball Classic, created by Major League Baseball, is to promote baseball across the globe. It’s players like Puerto Rico’s Javier Baez who are doing the best job in that regard, not boring white guys from the U.S. Potential baseball fans are not swayed into liking the sport when a player hits a home run and solemnly puts his head down to stroll the bases. They get excited and energized when players show emotion, flip their bats, celebrate. Baez did more to make baseball appeal to new and lapsed audiences with his premature celebration tag than the entire U.S. team has done this tournament.

Furthermore, it is hypocritical to want to diversify the sport’s audience while squelching incoming cultures.

Jim Leyland also got in on the action:

Go Puerto Rico.