Anthony Rendon: “I don’t watch baseball … it’s too long and boring”

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Nationals infielder Anthony Rendon was one of the league’s best players in the first half, hitting .287 with 13 homers and an .834 OPS while playing good defense at two positions, but he failed to make the All-Star team and … well, that’s just fine with him.

Rendon told Jason Butt of the Washington Post that he enjoyed the vacation because “we have a long season ahead.” As for the All-Star festivities, the 24-year-old revealed that he never watched the All-Star game as a kid and in fact he doesn’t really like watching baseball, period.

Seriously:

Rendon said he rarely watches the sport, preferring programs on networks such as the History channel instead. “I don’t watch baseball — it’s too long and boring,” he said.

In addition, Rendon and his family have a rule that they won’t talk about baseball when he visits. It’s clear Rendon, 24, has been able to separate his business from his personal life.

I tried to institute a similar rule within my family, banning them from discussing blogging in my presence, but my mom absolutely refuses to ask “what’s Craig like?” and “is D.J. as handsome in person?” and “does Drew really have an Oscar Taveras poster above his bed?”

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: