Red Sox release A.J. Pierzynski

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A.J. Pierzynski passed through waivers unclaimed after being designated for assignment by the Red Sox last week and has now been released.

That means Boston is on the hook for his entire $8.25 million salary and the 37-year-old catcher is able to sign with any team for whatever he can get. His parting gift was being badmouthed in the media on his way out the door, which is something the Red Sox have become extremely proficient at in recent years.

Pierzynski hit just .254 with four homers and a .633 OPS in 72 games for the Red Sox, posting a hideous 40/9 K/BB ratio and throwing out just 19 percent of stolen base attempts. He should be able to latch on somewhere as a part-timer down the stretch, but his days as a starting catcher are probably over.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.